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4 - Christians in Egypt, Libya, and Palestine Responding to the Aftermaths of the Arab Revolts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2018

Daniel Philpott
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
Timothy Samuel Shah
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
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Summary

This chapter traces the trajectory of Christians coping with the ripple effects of the post-2011 revolts in three contexts: Egypt, Libya and the OPT. Despite the very different political and historical contexts, Christians in these settings found themselves confronted with increased internal and external security laxity, volatile or collapse of enforcement of rule of law, and the ascendency or heightened activity of Islamist political movements. While these affected populations at large, they also had a religiously differentiated impact. Recognizing the plurality of voices and experiences of Christians within communities and across different country contexts, the chapter highlights the interface between Christian agency and changing power configurations in each of the three settings. However, it also identifies three recurring responses to increasing encroachments which manifest themselves both individually and collectively: adapting through coping strategies, exit, and resistance. The chapter analyses the drivers behind Christians’ choice of responses and presents five propositions to promote a more nuanced understanding of the interface between increased encroachment and strategies of survival. While they relate specifically to the Christians in the region, these propositions may also shed light more broadly on complex expressions of minority agency under religious persecution.
Type
Chapter
Information
Under Caesar's Sword
How Christians Respond to Persecution
, pp. 102 - 129
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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