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Introduction to Transdiagnostic Multiplex CBT for Muslim Cultural Groups

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 September 2020

Devon E. Hinton
Affiliation:
Harvard Medical School
Baland Jalal
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Summary

In the introductory chapter, we introduce transdiagnostic Multiplex CBT for Muslim Cultural Groups. We explain why there is currently a need for culturally sensitive treatments for Muslim populations and how Multiplex CBT fills this need. The chapter provides an overview of Multiplex CBT (e.g., specific treatment elements and key component of each session) and how it is culturally framed for a Muslim population. That is, it goes over the rationale for adapting particular treatment elements for this cultural group such as when teaching mindfulness and attentional control, addressing sleep-related issues, addressing worry, teaching anger management, and providing culturally indicated transitional rituals.

Type
Chapter
Information
Transdiagnostic Multiplex CBT for Muslim Cultural Groups
Treating Emotional Disorders
, pp. 1 - 18
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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