Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ms7nj Total loading time: 0.366 Render date: 2022-08-11T00:00:28.454Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

4 - “Auch unser Deutschland muss einmal frei werden”: The Immigrant Civil War Experience as a Mirror on Political Conditions in Germany

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2013

David E. Barclay
Affiliation:
Kalamazoo College, Michigan
Get access

Summary

In this chapter, evidence from immigrant letters is used to address the following question: How did German immigrants in the era before 1871 regard the political situation in their homeland? How widespread was the “spirit of 1848,” and, above all, how deeply did it extend down into the rank and file? How were political opinions and preferences concerning the United States, on the one hand, and Germany or Europe, on the other, interrelated, particularly in the Civil War era? This question extends to political partisanship, disposition toward the war effort itself, and toward the race issues that emerged from it. What effect did the confession, education, and social origins of immigrants have on their views? All these questions are closely interwoven with another issue, the degree to which emigration was politically motivated in the first place.

There are a number of works that skirt around the edges of these questions, but none that really gets at its center. Peter Marschalck has estimated that only a few thousand of the emigrants in the aftermath of 1848 were politically motivated. But as other scholars and I have argued, economic and political grievances were often closely intertwined, and at least a rudimentary political consciousness was much more widespread among immigrants than is often realized.

Type
Chapter
Information
Transatlantic Images and Perceptions
Germany and America since 1776
, pp. 87 - 108
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×