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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 April 2022

Ruth E. Kastner
Affiliation:
University of Maryland, Baltimore
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The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics
A Relativistic Treatment
, pp. 236 - 246
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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  • References
  • Ruth E. Kastner, University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • Book: The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics
  • Online publication: 22 April 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108907538.011
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  • References
  • Ruth E. Kastner, University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • Book: The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics
  • Online publication: 22 April 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108907538.011
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  • References
  • Ruth E. Kastner, University of Maryland, Baltimore
  • Book: The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics
  • Online publication: 22 April 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108907538.011
Available formats
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