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Chapter Eight - Trade and Calusa Complexity

Achieving Resilience in a Changing Environment

from Part II - The Role That Specific Institutions And Agents Played in Long-Distance Exchange

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 August 2022

Johan Ling
Affiliation:
University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Richard Chacon
Affiliation:
Winhrop University, South Carolina
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Summary

Scholarly interest in the emergence of social complexity is often intertwined with inquiries into reciprocity and trade. The stage was set for this research focus in the mid to late twentieth century with advances in dating techniques, new methods for tracing the origins of certain widely traded materials, improved ways of assessing food-consumption patterns and season of site occupation, multiscalar settlement studies, discussions about the applicability of various economic models, and debates between cultural evolutionists and those who embraced various strands of Marxism.

Type
Chapter
Information
Trade before Civilization
Long Distance Exchange and the Rise of Social Complexity
, pp. 173 - 206
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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