Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-5rzhg Total loading time: 0.254 Render date: 2021-12-06T22:21:15.254Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

11 - Patrick's Reasons for Leaving Britain

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2013

Get access

Summary

As a foreigner in his adoptive land with no kin to vouch for him, Patrick needed to secure protection from local kings who guaranteed his safety. Such protection, it seems, did not come cheaply. In his Confessio Patrick famously describes how he lavished praemia ‘gifts’ on kings and made mercedes ‘payments’ to sons of kings who travelled with him. He also had to grease the palms of judges, to whom he gave pretium quindecim hominum ‘the price of fifteen men’, although we are never told what he received in return. But while Patrick may have given gifts to others, he insists that he never received any himself. Rather, he turned down many gifts and refused to accept so much as dimidium scriptulae ‘half a scruple’, or even pretium calciamenti mei ‘the price of my shoe’ in return for performing baptisms. In an attempt to explain why Patrick should stress his generosity and meekness, Thomas Charles-Edwards proposed that ‘in part Patrick emphasised his attitude to gifts because of the accusation that he had gone to Ireland in the hope of enriching himself’. Echoes of this accusation can also be found in Patrick's insistence that he did not go to Ireland of his own free will. Charles-Edwards's comment is the impetus for the present essay, which asks why Patrick was suspected of going to Ireland for financial gain.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×