Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-mhx7p Total loading time: 0.772 Render date: 2022-05-24T00:05:15.342Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

11 - The threefold Christian anti-Judaism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 March 2010

Graham N. Stanton
Affiliation:
King's College London
Guy G. Stroumsa
Affiliation:
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Get access

Summary

Whereas some writers, following the example of Gibbon, would view monotheism as a system which of itself generates intolerance, others would consider intolerance to be the very measure of faith. Monotheism cannot, in fact, be the cause of division between Jews and Christians since, as Tertullian points out, both groups share the same conception of the divine even though their manner of worship differs (Apol. 21.2–3). And yet, the question which is at the heart of this book is a real one: can there or should there be limits to tolerance between the two faiths? Indeed, are there already existing limits? The question can be expressed in other ways: how can the two faiths maintain their distinctiveness and coexist? And how can self-identity be preserved when, as several contributors to this volume suggest, intolerance is an indication of a feeling of uncertainty and ‘a proof of weakness’? How can the transition be made from principle de iure to practice de facto when the distance from the law to the application of the law is so often a long way to travel? Is it a question of a majority-minority relationship? What justifications for intolerance can be offered, from both the Jewish and the Christian sides, if ‘tolerance and acceptance of one's neighbour, especially if he is a monotheist, are fundamental religious principles of the Synagogue’ or if, as Y. Leibovitz has underlined, ‘the Torah makes no provision for compelling by force’? What is to be made of the interpretations given within the Christian tradition of the well-known compelle intrare, ‘compel people to come in’ (Luke 14:23), in order to justify religious coercion?

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×