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5 - Earth Orientation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 October 2018

Dennis D. McCarthy
Affiliation:
United States Naval Observatory
P. Kenneth Seidelmann
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
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Summary

The International Celestial Reference System (ICRS) provides the models, constants, and algorithms along with the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) used to describe the positions and motions of celestial objects. Similarly, the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) provides the models, constants, and algorithms along with the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ICRF) used to describe the positions and motions of locations on the Earth. Algorithms that account for precession, nutation, variations in the Earth's rotational speed, and polar motion are available to transform coordinates and time between the two systems These rely on routine astronomical observations, but systematic changes in the systems and/or the transformation procedures can occur occasionally.
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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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