Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-9k7mv Total loading time: 0.321 Render date: 2022-01-19T13:41:49.383Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

5 - The relationship between United Nations sanctions and regional sanctions regimes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 March 2016

Andrea Charron
Affiliation:
University of Manitoba, Canada
Clara Portela
Affiliation:
Singapore Management University, Singapore
Thomas J. Biersteker
Affiliation:
Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva
Sue E. Eckert
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Marcos Tourinho
Affiliation:
Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Sao Paulo
Get access

Summary

One of the most notable developments in the sanctions landscape over the past couple of decades has been the proliferation of sanctions imposed by regional organizations. Of the sixty-three United Nations sanctions episodes studied by the consortium, forty-three involve regional organizations, in some cases a multiplicity of them. In twelve sanctions regimes, regional sanctions preceded the UN sanctions, and in ten cases, unilateral sanctions preceded UN sanctions. In fact, only six episodes are of stand-alone UN sanctions. This suggests that states subject to sanctions are increasingly targeted by a combination of UN and regional measures.

This development is interesting for several reasons. First, the use of sanctions outside of the framework of the UN has illustrated the willingness of regional organizations to employ coercive measures within their regions, even in the case of organizations created fairly recently. From this vantage point, it is symptomatic of the rise of regional governance. Second, in the past, sanctions had been criticized by Third-World leaders as a tool to impose a Western agenda on them. Indeed, many regional organizations in the developing world emerged as post-colonial projects with the explicit aim of shielding sovereign governments from external interference. The fact that some regional organizations now employing sanctions most frequently are located outside of the Western world is indicative of these measures’ growing legitimacy and usefulness as foreign policy tools. In addition, the increasingly frequent resort to sanctions signifies that some regions in the developing world, which have been traditionally at the receiving end of sanctions, are taking ownership of their security governance.

Despite the proliferation of sanctions adopted by regional arrangements, little attention has been devoted to them or to their relationship with UN sanctions. To date, research has focused primarily on regional organizations as implementers of UN sanctions – an issue that has gained currency especially following successful legal challenges to legislation giving effect to UN blacklists of individuals. But important questions as to the interrelationship between regional and UN sanctions exist – such as whether they complement or conflict with each other, and whether regional organizations follow the lead of UN sanctions or set the stage for the UN to act. This chapter explores the relationship between mandatory sanctions imposed by the UN Security Council, on the one hand, and regional organizations, on the other.

Type
Chapter
Information
Targeted Sanctions
The Impacts and Effectiveness of United Nations Action
, pp. 101 - 118
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×