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Case 61 - A 29-Year-Old G2P0 Woman with Symptomatic Ectopic Pregnancy and History of Prior Salpingectomy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Todd R. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Lisa Keder
Affiliation:
Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus
Abimola Famuyide
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Kimberly S. Gecsi
Affiliation:
Medical College of Wisconsin
David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
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Summary

A 29-year-old, gravida 2, para 0, 0, 1, 0, presents to the emergency room with left lower quadrant pain and vaginal bleeding. Her last menstrual period was six weeks ago. Her pain was acute in onset but now is intermittent and crampy in nature. She denies dizziness, nausea, vomiting, urinary, and gastrointestinal symptoms. She has a past medical history of pelvic inflammatory disease and past surgical history of laparoscopic right salpingectomy for ectopic pregnancy. She is taking oral contraceptive pills and has no know drug allergies.

Type
Chapter
Information
Surgical Gynecology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 186 - 188
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 193: Tubal ectopic pregnancy. ACOG website, 2018. Available at: https://www.acog.org/clinical/clinical-guidance/practice-bulletin/articles/2018/03/tubal-ectopic-pregnancy (Accessed April 3, 2021.)Google Scholar
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