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Case 46 - A 22-Year-Old G3P0030 Woman with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss and Uterine Septum

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Todd R. Jenkins
Affiliation:
University of Alabama, Birmingham
Lisa Keder
Affiliation:
Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus
Abimola Famuyide
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Kimberly S. Gecsi
Affiliation:
Medical College of Wisconsin
David Chelmow
Affiliation:
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine
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Summary

A 22-year-old female, gravida 3, para 0, presents to the office for evaluation of recurrent pregnancy loss. Her obstetric history is significant for three prior first-trimester losses, all managed expectantly. She has regular menstrual cycles and has not had difficulty with conceiving in the past. She has been in a relationship with her partner for four years and they desire to conceive at this time. She has no significant past medical or family history and has not had prior surgery. She takes no medications and has no allergies.

Type
Chapter
Information
Surgical Gynecology
A Case-Based Approach
, pp. 140 - 142
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

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