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1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

Michael B. Green
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
John H. Schwarz
Affiliation:
California Institute of Technology
Edward Witten
Affiliation:
Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey
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Summary

The Early Days of Dual Models

In 1900, in the course of trying to fit to experimental data, Planck wrote down his celebrated formula for black body radiation. It does not usually happen in physics that an experimental curve is directly related to the fundamentals of a theory; normally they are related by a more or less intricate chain of calculations. But black body radiation was a lucky exception to this rule. In fitting to experimental curves, Planck wrote down a formula that directly led, as we all know, to the concept of the quantum.

In the 1960s, one of the mysteries in strong interaction physics was the enormous proliferation of strongly interacting particles or hadrons. Hadronic resonances seemed to exist with rather high spin, the mass squared of the lightest particle of spin J being roughly m2 = J, where α ˜ l(GeV)−2 is a constant that became known as the Regge slope. Such behavior was tested up to about J = 11/2, and it seemed conceivable that it might continue indefinitely. One reason that the proliferation of strongly interacting particles was surprising was that the behavior of the weak and electromagnetic interactions was quite different; there are, comparatively speaking, just a few low mass particles known that do not have strong interactions.

The resonances were so numerous that it was not plausible that they were all fundamental.

Type
Chapter
Information
Superstring Theory
25th Anniversary Edition
, pp. 1 - 56
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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  • Introduction
  • Michael B. Green, University of Cambridge, John H. Schwarz, California Institute of Technology, Edward Witten, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey
  • Book: Superstring Theory
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139248563.002
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  • Introduction
  • Michael B. Green, University of Cambridge, John H. Schwarz, California Institute of Technology, Edward Witten, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey
  • Book: Superstring Theory
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139248563.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Michael B. Green, University of Cambridge, John H. Schwarz, California Institute of Technology, Edward Witten, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey
  • Book: Superstring Theory
  • Online publication: 05 September 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139248563.002
Available formats
×