Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-wg55d Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-21T07:28:33.977Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 13 - The use of donor insemination

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2010

Gab Kovacs
Affiliation:
Monash IVF, Melbourne, Australia
Get access

Summary

Donor insemination (DI) remains a very important treatment option with acceptable pregnancy rates. In order to optimize pregnancy rates with DI, careful consideration should be given to various aspects of this service, including the recruitment and screening of sperm donors, cryopreservation of semen, and the screening and management of recipients. This chapter examines these important aspects of treatment to consider how to optimize DI services in the future. Treatment using DI was initially designed to treat male factor infertility. However, DI remains a therapeutic option for male factor infertility when either too few or no sperm are obtained at surgical sperm aspiration. With the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) many assumed that DI would become a very limited treatment. Although the numbers of cycles have reduced considerably there has been an increasing trend for DI to be used for other groups of patients such as single women and lesbians.
Type
Chapter
Information
The Subfertility Handbook
A Clinician's Guide
, pp. 148 - 157
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×