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19 - Collecting Data

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2019

Joanna M. Setchell
Affiliation:
Durham University
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Summary

Data collection is fun and exciting. It can also be difficult and dull at times. Things don’t always go to plan (ask other researchers about projects that didn’t work – we all have plenty of examples). In this chapter, I cover the importance of monitoring the progress of your project, being flexible and open to opportunities, being prepared for the unforeseen, collecting data rigorously and systematically, keeping data and samples safe, and being considerate of other people.

Type
Chapter
Information
Studying Primates
How to Design, Conduct and Report Primatological Research
, pp. 241 - 246
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

Caro, TM, Roper, R, Young, M, Dank, GR. 1979. Inter-observer reliability. Behaviour 69: 303315. http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156853979X00520. How and why we measure inter-observer reliability. Focusses on measuring behaviour.Google Scholar
Holman, L, Head, ML, Lanfear, R, Jennions, MD. 2015. Evidence of experimental bias in the life sciences: Why we need blind data recording. PLOS Biology 13: e1002190. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002190. Shows that blind data collection is rare in the life sciences, provides evidence that this leads to bias, and proposes methods to address this.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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  • Collecting Data
  • Joanna M. Setchell, Durham University
  • Book: Studying Primates
  • Online publication: 19 September 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108368513.020
Available formats
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Collecting Data
  • Joanna M. Setchell, Durham University
  • Book: Studying Primates
  • Online publication: 19 September 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108368513.020
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Collecting Data
  • Joanna M. Setchell, Durham University
  • Book: Studying Primates
  • Online publication: 19 September 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108368513.020
Available formats
×