Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-cxxrm Total loading time: 0.748 Render date: 2021-12-05T06:36:43.815Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

21 - Analysing and Interpreting Data

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2019

Joanna M. Setchell
Affiliation:
Durham University
Get access

Summary

Data analysis and interpretation allow you to test your predictions and interpret your results. This is an exciting time and can be daunting because it’s a big change from data collection. It’s very unlikely that you will have collected exactly the data you set out to collect, but your analysis plan will keep you on track and avoid the dangers of aimlessly exploring your dataset. You will probably need further statistical advice at this stage. This chapter guides you through data preparation, initial data analysis, hypothesis testing, calculating your effect sizes and confidence intervals, interpreting your results and extrapolating from them.

Type
Chapter
Information
Studying Primates
How to Design, Conduct and Report Primatological Research
, pp. 263 - 270
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Benjamini, Y, Hochberg, Y. 1995. Controlling the false discovery rate: A practical and powerful approach to multiple testing. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series B 57: 289300. https://doi.org/10.2307/2346101. Proposes the false discovery rate and a procedure to control it.Google Scholar
Ihle, M, Winney, IS, Krysalli, A, Croucher, M. 2017. Striving for transparent and credible research: Practical guidelines for behavioral ecologists. Behavioral Ecology 28: 348354. https://doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arx003. An example of the application of open (transparent) practices to a field.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mundry, R, Fischer, J. 1998. Use of statistical programs for nonparametric tests of small samples often leads to incorrect P values: Examples from Animal Behaviour. Animal Behaviour 56: 256259. https://doi.org/10.1006/anbe.1998.0756. Highlights the need for exact (rather than asymptotic) test procedures for non-parametric statistics.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Neuhauser, M, Ruxton, GD. 2009. Round your numbers in rank tests: exact and asymptotic inference and ties. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 64: 297303. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265–009-0843-1. Warns against pseudo-precision in ranking data.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nosek, BA, Ebersole, CR, DeHaven, AC, Mellor, DT. 2018. The preregistration revolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 115: 26002606. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1708274114. Introduces preregistration and addresses challenges to it, including how to handle changes to the methods and violations of assumptions.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parker, TH, Bowman, SD, Nakagawa, S, Gurevitch, J, Mellor, DT, Rosenblatt, RP, DeHaven, AC. 2018. Tools for Transparency in Ecology and Evolution. http://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/G65CB. A checklist of questions to maximise transparency in science.
Pike, N, 2011. Using false discovery rates for multiple comparisons in ecology and evolution. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 2: 278282. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2041-210X.2010.00061.x. Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of analyses based on the false discovery rate and provides spreadsheet programmes to calculate false discovery rates.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×