Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-prt4h Total loading time: 0.306 Render date: 2021-10-24T00:49:03.029Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Vincent van Gogh, Dante, and the Studio of the South

from II - Other Responses to Medievalism (and Authenticity)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2018

Aida Audeh
Affiliation:
Professor of Art History at Hamline University, is a frequent contributor to Studies in Medievalism and an expert on nineteenth-century European artists’ use of Dante and his writing as source and inspiration for works of art.
Get access

Summary

You'll see him soon, this young man with the Dante-like face […]. He's quite distinguished in appearance, and he'll become so in his paintings […]. Ah well, thanks to him – at last I have a first sketch of that painting I've been dreaming about for a long time – the poet. He posed for it for me. His fine head, with its green gaze, stands out in my portrait against a starry, deep ultramarine sky; his clothing is a little yellow jacket, a collar of unbleached linen, a multicoloured tie. He gave me two sittings in one day.

– Vincent to Theo, from Arles, 3 September 1888 (Letter 673)

With this, Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh (1853–90) described his painting, Portrait of Eugène Boch (Plate I), as the expression of his ideal Artist/Poet: “this young man with the Dante-like face.” Central to his plans for the community of painters he wished to found at the Yellow House in Arles in 1888, the Dante-like Artist/Poet was to be joined, in Vincent's utopian vision for his “Studio of the South,” by modern-day equivalents of Dante's compatriots Petrarch and Boccaccio, hence completing the triumvirate commonly known then, as now, as the Tre Corone.

Perhaps the most prolific period of his life as an artist, source of many of his best-known works, site of his ill-fated collaboration with Paul Gauguin and infamous episode of self-mutilation, Vincent's Studio of the South has been the subject of several studies and exhibitions. And while the Portrait of Eugène Boch and other paintings originating from Vincent's Studio of the South endeavor – including The Bedroom and the Poet's Garden series – have been analyzed extensively in art historical literature, their relationship, and that of the utopian artists’ community they embodied, to Vincent's conception of Dante and the Tre Corone have not been explored within the context of the layered meanings brought by their historical origins and their larger nineteenth-century reception.

Type
Chapter
Information
Studies in Medievalism XXVII
Authenticity, Medievalism, Music
, pp. 123 - 150
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Vincent van Gogh, Dante, and the Studio of the South
    • By Aida Audeh, Professor of Art History at Hamline University, is a frequent contributor to Studies in Medievalism and an expert on nineteenth-century European artists’ use of Dante and his writing as source and inspiration for works of art.
  • Edited by Karl Fugelso
  • Book: Studies in Medievalism XXVII
  • Online publication: 05 May 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787442184.012
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Vincent van Gogh, Dante, and the Studio of the South
    • By Aida Audeh, Professor of Art History at Hamline University, is a frequent contributor to Studies in Medievalism and an expert on nineteenth-century European artists’ use of Dante and his writing as source and inspiration for works of art.
  • Edited by Karl Fugelso
  • Book: Studies in Medievalism XXVII
  • Online publication: 05 May 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787442184.012
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Vincent van Gogh, Dante, and the Studio of the South
    • By Aida Audeh, Professor of Art History at Hamline University, is a frequent contributor to Studies in Medievalism and an expert on nineteenth-century European artists’ use of Dante and his writing as source and inspiration for works of art.
  • Edited by Karl Fugelso
  • Book: Studies in Medievalism XXVII
  • Online publication: 05 May 2018
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781787442184.012
Available formats
×