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3 - Mass Opinions: Globalization and Issues as Axes of Contention

from Part I - Domestic Impacts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 June 2019

Pieter de Wilde
Affiliation:
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim
Ruud Koopmans
Affiliation:
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Wolfgang Merkel
Affiliation:
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Oliver Strijbis
Affiliation:
Universitat Zurich
Michael Zürn
Affiliation:
Freie Universität Berlin
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Summary

This chapter aims to answer two general questions: Is there conflict on certain core issues relating to globalization within societies; and does the context of globalization matter for the strength of this conflict? Results show quite strong aggregate correlations between economic and cultural globalization and support for migration, between political and cultural globalization and support for internationalized governance, and some support for a relationship between problem loads and issue orientations. At the individual level, our results show that educational differences produce strong differences in issue orientations in particular regarding migration and global warming, the higher the level of education, the stronger the support for migration and, to some extent, for border-crossing authority as well, and the higher the sensitivity to environmental problems. Results also show that the contexts of globalization shape the degree how strong differences between social and ideological groups have an impact on issue orientations. Generally, the more globalized a country is, the more polarized opinions are between social and political groups in society.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Struggle Over Borders
Cosmopolitanism and Communitarianism
, pp. 65 - 88
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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