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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 June 2018

Iver B. Neumann
Affiliation:
The Fridtjof Nansen Institute
Einar Wigen
Affiliation:
Universitetet i Oslo
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The Steppe Tradition in International Relations
Russians, Turks and European State Building 4000 BCE–2017 CE
, pp. 268 - 297
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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