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The Monster and Other Stories (1901)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

George Monteiro
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
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Summary

“Novels of the Week.” Spectator 86 (February 16, 1901), p. 244

It is a case of “‘Eclipse’ first, and the rest nowhere” this week, so incontestably superior is Mr. Stephen Crane's work to that of the seven other writers to be noticed below. Two at least of the stories have already seen the light in magazine form, “His New Mittens”—a touching story of a little boy who, yielding to the force of public opinion, disobeyed his mother's instructions, was punished on his return, ran away from home in a fit of resentment, and was brought back by a kindly tradesman—and the very striking and rather ghastly story which gives its name to the collection. This narrates how a good-natured, childishly vain coloured groom saved the life of his master's little boy from a fire caused by his own carelessness, but sustained such terrible injuries as to affect his reason, and disfigure his appearance to the extent of monstrosity. The boy's father, a skilful doctor, saves the poor fellow's life, and pensions him off, but the horror which “the Monster” inspires is so great that his guardians refuse to keep him, he breaks out and creates a panic in the town, and finally, when the doctor has taken the monster back to his own house, he is repaid for his humanity by being boycotted by his neighbours.

Type
Chapter
Information
Stephen Crane
The Contemporary Reviews
, pp. 245 - 250
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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References

Publishers' Circular 74 (February 23, 1901), p. 191.
The Literary Work.” Academy 60 (March 2, 1901), p. 177.
Novel Notes.” Bookman 20 (April 1901), p. 26.

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