Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-t4qhp Total loading time: 0.312 Render date: 2022-08-19T03:05:04.258Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Maggie: A Girl of the Streets (1893)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

George Monteiro
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Get access

Summary

“A Remarkable Book.” Port Jervis Union, March 3, 1893, p. 3

The Union has been favored with a copy of a recently published novel entitled, “Maggie, a Girl of the Streets,” by Stephen Crane of New York city. The writer is a son of the late Rev. J. T. Crane and a brother of Judge Wm. H. Crane, which facts, apart from the merits of the publication, will invest it with a certain degree of local interest.

The plot is laid in the slums and dives of the great metropolis and the characters depicted are all, without exception, creatures of the slums. The evident object of the writer is to show the tremendous influence of environment on the human character and destiny. Maggie, the heroine, or central figure of the tale, grows up under surroundings which repress all good impulses, stunt the moral growth and render it inevitable that she should become what she eventually did, a creature of the streets. The pathos of her sad story will be deeply felt by all susceptible persons who read the book.

The slum life of New York city is treated with the frank fidelity of the realist, and while the unco guid [sic] and ultra pious may be shocked by the freedom of his descriptions and the language in which the dialogues are carried on, sensible people will read the book in the spirit in which it was written and will derive therefrom the moral lesson which it is the author's aim to inculcate.

Type
Chapter
Information
Stephen Crane
The Contemporary Reviews
, pp. 1 - 8
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

New York Recorder. 1894? Scrapbooks, Stephen Crane Collection, Columbia University.
Edwards, E. J.. “Uncut Leaves,” American Press Association Release. May 1, 1894.
Howells, William Dean. “Life and Letters.” Harper's Weekly 39 (June 8, 1895), p. 533.Google Scholar
“Stephen Crane's ‘Maggie.’” New York Commercial Advertiser, April 11, 1896, p. 17.

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×