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George's Mother (1896)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

George Monteiro
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
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Summary

“Scenes of Low Life: Strong Characters and Incidents Depicted by Stephen Crane in George's Mother.” New York Herald, June 6, 1896, p. 13

A very clever writer is Stephen Crane, and he has written nothing more clever than “George's Mother,” which has just been published by Edward Arnold. A small book it is, and the story is a simple one. The characters in it are not attractive, and the incidents are vulgar, and will to some hypersensitive readers seem repulsive. Mr. Crane has drawn the characters and described the incidents with considerable skill, and if workmanship alone is to be considered “George's Mother” is in some degree a work of art. But workmanship is not the only factor in a literary production, and more than faultless workmanship is needed if a book is to have enduring vitality. Great works of fiction endure from generation to generation, because their characters are either true to life or are stamped with an individuality which renders it impossible for us to forget them. Mr. Crane may some day give us one or two such characters, but I see no trace of them in “George's Mother.” As an authority on slum life he takes high rank, but is it necessary to tell us so very much about life in the slums? Zola has treated this subject with unparalleled skill, and yet at times we even weary of Zola.

Type
Chapter
Information
Stephen Crane
The Contemporary Reviews
, pp. 69 - 98
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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References

Gilder, Jeannette L.. “Romance by Swinburne, and Realism by Crane.” New York World, May 31, 1896, p. 20.Google Scholar
“Books and Authors.” Boston Traveler, June 6, 1896, p. 10.
New York Sun, June 13, 1896, p. 7.
“Stephen Crane's Stories.” Philadelphia Press, June 21, 1896, p. 36.
New York Times, June 21, 1896, p. 27.
Some of the New Fiction.” Argonaut 38 (June 22, 1896), p. 9.
Among the Newest Books: Novels and Short Stories.” Book Buyer 13 (July 1896), pp. 357–358.
Notes.” Citizen 2 (July 1896), p. 177.
“New Books.” New York Press, July 12, 1896, p. 26.
Rinder, Frank. Academy 50 (July 25, 1896), p. 64.
Book Notes.” Peterson Magazine 6 (August 1896), p. 871.
“Novels.” Manchester Guardian, August 1, 1896, p. 10.
Boyce, Neith. “Book Notes and News.” Lotus 1 (September 1896), p. 983.Google Scholar

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