Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-qdp55 Total loading time: 0.8 Render date: 2021-12-03T07:59:33.822Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Part 4 - Trophoblast, amniotic fluid, endometrium, and bone marrow

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2013

Carlos Simón
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Antonio Pellicer
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Renee Reijo Pera
Affiliation:
Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine
Get access

Summary

This chapter focuses on amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) isolated from the amniotic fluid and placental membranes, discussing their properties and potential clinical applications. The highly multipotent differentiation potential of AFSCs opens the possibility of the cell type being utilized to treat a wide range of diseases through the generation of replacement cells in the laboratory. The ability to use AFSCs to generate large numbers of osteocytes, myocytes, adipocytes, endothelial cells, hepatocytes, chondrocytes, and neurons provides a valuable tool for the development of novel cell therapies. In pre-clinical studies, AFSCs have shown efficacy in the treatment of bone defects, heart disease, kidney disease, neural degeneration, lung disease, and blood disorders. Future applications of AFSCs include the treatment of diabetes, the generation of a living-skin equivalent, for muscle regeneration, as a novel drug delivery system, as well as anti-inflammatory applications for graft vs. host disease.
Type
Chapter
Information
Stem Cells in Reproductive Medicine
Basic Science and Therapeutic Potential
, pp. 102 - 151
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×