Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 0.727 Render date: 2021-12-08T14:25:45.047Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Part 2 - Male gamete

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2013

Carlos Simón
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Antonio Pellicer
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Renee Reijo Pera
Affiliation:
Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine
Get access

Summary

This chapter describes the existing knowledge regarding the ideal molecular profile of sperm cells, in order to define the model to be mimicked when stem cells are employed in order to create male gametes. Sperm production is defective in a significant proportion of males aiming at fatherhood. Interestingly, there are a significant proportion of infertile males presenting normal sperm counts, thus diagnosed as having idiopathic infertility. To date, there are a lot of studies concerning DNA analysis of human spermatozoa suggesting that the determination of DNA fragmentation levels can be a parameter of semen quality, directly implicated in male fertility. Sperm membrane lipid composition is of special interest, given their involvement in fertilization, capacitation, spermatozoa, and oocyte interaction. The future vision shows the possibility to create sperm cells from adult stem cells, with all the requirements to succeed fulfilled, thus guaranteeing a safe and successful use.
Type
Chapter
Information
Stem Cells in Reproductive Medicine
Basic Science and Therapeutic Potential
, pp. 30 - 62
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×