Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-7mfl8 Total loading time: 0.661 Render date: 2021-12-05T06:37:53.757Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Part 1 - Female gamete

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2013

Carlos Simón
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Antonio Pellicer
Affiliation:
Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, University of Valencia
Renee Reijo Pera
Affiliation:
Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine
Get access

Summary

This chapter reviews molecular mechanisms that control germline formation through a complex cascade of gene activation. In mammals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are derived from the proximal epiblast during early embryogenesis. Interestingly, although both FRAGILIS and STELLA are differentially expressed in PGCs, neither appears to be essential for PGC specification. In general, migration of PGCs from primitive streak to genital ridges is believed to be governed by chemotactic cytokines, cell surface receptors, and cell adhesion factors. Until the colonization of the genital ridges, XX and XY PGCs are indistinguishable in terms of morphology and behavior. Mammalian male sex determination is initiated by sex-determining region Y (SRY) expression in XY genital ridges, which triggers Sertoli cell differentiation in supporting cell precursors. Germ-cell colonization of the gonads is followed by sex determination. Expression of sex-specific genes in somatic tissues initiates molecular events that lead to testis or ovary development.
Type
Chapter
Information
Stem Cells in Reproductive Medicine
Basic Science and Therapeutic Potential
, pp. 1 - 29
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×