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12 - The DAZ gene family and human germ cell development from embryonic stem cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 August 2009

Mark S. Fox
Affiliation:
Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA
Renee A. Reijo Pera
Affiliation:
Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA
Amander T. Clark
Affiliation:
Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA
Christopher J. De Jonge
Affiliation:
University of Minnesota
Christopher Barratt
Affiliation:
University of Birmingham
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Summary

Introduction

Ten to fifteen percent of couples are infertile (Hull et al., 1985). Yet, very little is known of the genetics of infertility in men or women. Given the heavy reliance upon technology in Western countries to bypass germ cell defects, it is timely that we begin to understand the genetics of infertility and the outcomes to the reproductive and somatic development of children that are conceived. Here we discuss studies that led to a greater understanding of one gene family implicated in human germ cell development, the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) gene family and then review findings of experiments aimed at establishing an in vitro genetic system to study human germ cell formation and early differentiation. These studies provide the framework for building the genetic tools that are required to probe the functional genetics of germ cell development in men and women. With time, we expect that the availability of a system to assay the complex functions of human genes and gene variants in vitro will result in increased ability to design rational therapeutics for germ cell defects, to accurately assess outcomes of infertility treatments, to minimize risks associated with use of assisted reproduction and to develop useful genetic tests to aid infertile couples.

Specification of the germ cell lineage in vivo in model organisms

Two divergent developmental programs are associated with specification of the germ cell lineage in model organisms.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Sperm Cell
Production, Maturation, Fertilization, Regeneration
, pp. 323 - 350
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • The DAZ gene family and human germ cell development from embryonic stem cells
    • By Mark S. Fox, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA, Renee A. Reijo Pera, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA, Amander T. Clark, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Edited by Christopher J. De Jonge, University of Minnesota, Christopher Barratt, University of Birmingham
  • Book: The Sperm Cell
  • Online publication: 14 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545115.013
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  • The DAZ gene family and human germ cell development from embryonic stem cells
    • By Mark S. Fox, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA, Renee A. Reijo Pera, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA, Amander T. Clark, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Edited by Christopher J. De Jonge, University of Minnesota, Christopher Barratt, University of Birmingham
  • Book: The Sperm Cell
  • Online publication: 14 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545115.013
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • The DAZ gene family and human germ cell development from embryonic stem cells
    • By Mark S. Fox, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA, Renee A. Reijo Pera, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA, Amander T. Clark, Program in Human Embryonic Stem Cell Biology; Center for Reproductive Sciences; Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Physiology and Urology, and Programs in Developmental and Stem Cell Biology and Human Genetics; University of California; San Francisco, CA, USA
  • Edited by Christopher J. De Jonge, University of Minnesota, Christopher Barratt, University of Birmingham
  • Book: The Sperm Cell
  • Online publication: 14 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511545115.013
Available formats
×