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8 - The Staging of Góngora's Three Funereal Sonnets for Margarita de Austria Estiria

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2014

Jean Andrews
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
Jean Andrews
Affiliation:
Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, University of Nottingham
Isabel Torres
Affiliation:
Professor of Spanish Golden Age Literature at Queen's University, Belfast
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Summary

Luis de Góngora y Argote's three funeral sonnets for Margarita de Austria Estiria were published in 1612 in the festival book recording the exequies to mark the post-partum death of the queen, celebrated in the Santa Iglesia, Córdoba Cathedral, on 1 and 2 January of that year. Góngora's three sonnets appear first in a collection of poetry consisting of over thirty sonnets and also canciones, estancias and décimas composed expressly for the exequies by the poets of Córdoba, the vast majority of whom, understandably since the event was organised by the Cathedral chapter, appear to have been clergy. A small number of these contributors were considerably more prolific than Góngora, who produced, apart from the three opening sonnets, an estança (in octava real) and a pair of décimas, six poems in all. Antonio de Paredes, for example, a native of Badajoz who spent much of his brief adulthood (he died aged 32) in Córdoba, is credited with Sonnets VII-XVI, twenty in all, while the Augustinian Padre Andrés Márquez penned nine. These poems are followed by hieroglyphics and imprese explaining the decoration of the three-tier funereal monument or catafalque which housed the simulacrum of the queen's coffin, the centrepiece of the spectacle, and the nave of the cathedral. The poems, with illustrated hieroglyphics and imprese would have been hung on the catafalque itself and on the black draperies lining the nave as the congregation entered the cathedral.

Type
Chapter
Information
Spanish Golden Age Poetry in Motion
The Dynamics of Creation and Conversation
, pp. 131 - 146
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2014

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