Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-5nwft Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-30T11:23:35.173Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

9 - Jealousy in María de Zayas's Intercalated Poetry: Lyric Illness and Narrative Cure

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 November 2014

Dana Bultman
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
Jean Andrews
Affiliation:
Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies, University of Nottingham
Isabel Torres
Affiliation:
Professor of Spanish Golden Age Literature at Queen's University, Belfast
Get access

Summary

María de Zayas's dynamic use of intercalated poetry in her Novelas amorosas y ejemplares (1637) and Parte segunda del Sarao y entretenimiento honesto (1647) provides us with a sustained example of ‘poetry in motion’ across hundreds of narrative pages. Over the course of these works, Zayas intersperses lyric forms in her narrative, creating generic contrasts that are integral to the structure of both books and offering evidence for the gradual transformation of her central character, Lisis.

As readers progress through the frame that enfolds and interconnects the twenty novellas of Zayas's two books, they follow the thread of the story of Lisis, the frame narrative's protagonist and, as some critics have suggested, Zayas's alter ego. Lisis first appears at the opening of the Novelas amorosas as a poet, weakened in body and mind because Don Juan has spurned her. As the sarao begins she is lying on her couch, sickened by the sort of early modern ‘amorous jealousy’ Steven Wagschal has defined as ‘a group of emotions, feelings, thoughts, bodily changes, and attitudes that are experienced in relation to guarding the exclusivity of a relationship that one possesses from a rival and/or avenging the loss of that which was possessed’. Through the course of the works as a whole, Lisis makes a systematic conversion from poet to narrator as well as from illness to health. She undergoes these changes in her mental and physical state as she overcomes Don Juan's rejection.

Type
Chapter
Information
Spanish Golden Age Poetry in Motion
The Dynamics of Creation and Conversation
, pp. 147 - 164
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×