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Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

William F. Hosford
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
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Summary

The intent of this book is to provide a background in the mechanics of solids for students of mechanical engineering without confusing them with too much detail on why materials behave as they do. The topics of this book are similar to those in Deformation and Fracture of Solids by R. M. Caddell. Much of the material is drawn from another book by the author, Mechanical Behavior of Materials. To make the text suitable for Mechanical Engineers, the chapters on slip, dislocations, twinning, residual stresses, and hardening mechanisms have been eliminated and the treatments in other chapters about ductility, viscoelasticity, creep, ceramics, and polymers have been simplified. If there is insufficient time or interest, the last two chapters, “Mechanical Working” and “Anisotropy,” may be omitted. It is assumed that the students have already had courses covering materials science and basic statics.

I want to thank Professor Robert Caddell for the inspiration to write texts. Discussions with Professor Jwo Pan about what to include were helpful.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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  • Preface
  • William F. Hosford, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Book: Solid Mechanics
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511841422.001
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  • Preface
  • William F. Hosford, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Book: Solid Mechanics
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511841422.001
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Preface
  • William F. Hosford, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Book: Solid Mechanics
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511841422.001
Available formats
×