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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2015

William I. Brustein
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Louisa Roberts
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
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The Socialism of Fools?
Leftist Origins of Modern Anti-Semitism
, pp. 199 - 208
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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