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15 - Social Meaning and the Temporal Dynamics of Sound Changes

from Part III - Meaning and Linguistic Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 July 2021

Lauren Hall-Lew
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Emma Moore
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield
Robert J. Podesva
Affiliation:
Stanford University, California
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Summary

The first study reveals that GOAT exhibits a higher F2 when it occurs in the context of smiling, which suggests that some sound changes may be advancing during moments when the body is used to express heightened affect. The second study illustrates that the more durative embodied practice of maintaining an open-jaw setting has had lowering consequences across the vowel system of California English – even for GOAT, which is typically described as undergoing fronting rather than lowering.

Type
Chapter
Information
Social Meaning and Linguistic Variation
Theorizing the Third Wave
, pp. 338 - 362
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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