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Part III - Meaning and Linguistic Change

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 July 2021

Lauren Hall-Lew
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
Emma Moore
Affiliation:
University of Sheffield
Robert J. Podesva
Affiliation:
Stanford University, California
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Social Meaning and Linguistic Variation
Theorizing the Third Wave
, pp. 265 - 387
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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