Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-8hm5d Total loading time: 0.41 Render date: 2022-05-29T02:15:51.201Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

16 - Reciprocal interactions and the development of communication and language between parents and children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 August 2010

Charles T. Snowdon
Affiliation:
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Martine Hausberger
Affiliation:
Université de Rennes I, France
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

The first studies of language acquisition by the child described mainly the developmental stages of this specific human ability From Piaget (1923) to Brown (1973), authors were interested mostly in the different formal aspects of the acquisition: for example, the age of onset, total amount of language at any age, mean length of utterance, and emergence of grammar. These studies considered the abilities of each child as representative of the general linguistic abilities of the human species at this ontogenetic stage.

More recently, new trends have appeared, where language is studied in a more pragmatic way: it is considered as a means, at each developmental stage, for a child to elicit real communicative interactions. Thus, while admitting that the general stages of language development are alike in any child (Locke & Snow, Chapter 14) such an approach to the development of communication implies integrating various aspects that are usually considered separately by different researchers.

On the one hand, to consider the emerging linguistic skill as part of the larger phenomenon of communication implies integrating the analysis of the linguistic competence of a child at a given stage with that of previous stages, in particular with babbling. It implies also the integration of other communicative behaviors: for example, approaches, emotional addresses, and object exchanges. It can be hypothesized that, when a child is communicating, it is both acquiring the human language and developing its personal communicative style with human beings.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×