Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-c6lpx Total loading time: 1.003 Render date: 2022-11-26T17:26:15.663Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Part Six

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2018

Assaf Yasur-Landau
Affiliation:
University of Haifa, Israel
Eric H. Cline
Affiliation:
George Washington University, Washington DC
Yorke Rowan
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
The Social Archaeology of the Levant
From Prehistory to the Present
, pp. 571 - 633
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References

Albright, W. F. 1932. The Archaeology of Palestine and the Bible. Richard Lectures 31. New York: Revell.Google Scholar
Alt, A. 1966. Essays on Old Testament History and Religion. Trans. Wilson, R. A., from German. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Amiran, R., and Ilan, O. 1996. Early Arad II: The Chalcolithic and Early Bronze IB Settlements and the Early Bronze II City; Architecture and Town Planning; Sixth to Eighteenth Seasons of Excavations, 1971–1978, 1980–1984. Jerusalem: IES.Google Scholar
Amiran, R.; Paran, U.; Shiloh, Y.; Brown, R.; Tsafrir, Y.; and Ben-Tor, A. 1978. Early Arad I: The Chalcolithic Settlement and Early Bronze City; First–Fifth Seasons of Excavations, 1962–1966. Jerusalem: IES.Google Scholar
Ben-Tor, A. 1992. The Early Bronze Age. In The Archaeology of Ancient Israel, ed. Ben-Tor, A., 81125. Trans. Greenberg, R., from Hebrew. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Ben-Tor, A. 2000. Hazor and the Chronology of Northern Israel: A Reply to Israel Finkelstein. BASOR 317: 916.Google Scholar
Bowman, S. 1995. Radiocarbon Dating. 2nd ed. Interpreting the Past. London: British Museum Press.Google Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C. 2008. Radiocarbon Dating: Revolutions in Understanding. Archaeometry 50: 249–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C. 2009a. Bayesian Analysis of Radiocarbon Dates. Radiocarbon 51: 337–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C. 2009b. Dealing with Outliers and Offsets in Radiocarbon Dating. Radiocarbon 51: 1023–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C.; Dee, M. W.; Rowland, J. M.; Higham, T. F. G.; Harris, S. A.; Brock, F.; Quiles, A.; Wild, E. M.; Marcus, E. S.; and Shortland, A. J. 2010. Radiocarbon-Based Chronology for Dynastic Egypt. Science 328 (5985): 1554–7.Google Scholar
Bronk Ramsey, C.; Higham, T. F. G.; Owen, D. C.; Pike, A. W. G.; and Hedges, R. E. M. 2002. Radiocarbon Dates from the Oxford AMS System: Archaeometry Datelist 31. Archaeometry 44: 1150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruins, H. J. 2001. Near East Chronology: Towards an Integrated 14C Time Foundation. Radiocarbon 43: 1147–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruins, H. J., and Mook, W. G. 1989. The Need for a Calibrated Radiocarbon Chronology of Near Eastern Archaeology. Radiocarbon 31: 1019–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruins, H. J.; van der Plicht, J.; and Mazar, A. 2003. 14C Dates from Tel Rehov: Iron-Age Chronology, Pharaohs, and Hebrew Kings. Science 300 (5617): 315–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buck, C. E.; Kenworthy, J. B.; Litton, C. D.; and Smith, A. F. M. 1991. Combining Archaeological and Radiocarbon Information: A Bayesian Approach to Calibration. Antiquity 65 (249): 808–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Callaway, J. A. 1978. New Perspectives on Early Bronze III in Canaan. In Archaeology in the Levant: Essays for Kathleen Kenyon, ed. Moorey, P. R. S. and Parr, P. J., 4658. Warminster: Aris & Phillips.Google Scholar
Chesson, M. S. 2015. Reconceptualizing the Early Bronze Age Southern Levant without Cities: Local Histories and Walled Communities of EB II–III Society. JMA 28: 5179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chesson, M. S., and Goodale, N. 2014. Population Aggregation, Residential Storage and Socioeconomic Inequality at Early Bronze Age Numayra, Jordan. JAA 35: 117–34.Google Scholar
Chesson, M. S., and Philip, G. 2003. Tales of the City? “Urbanism” in the Early Bronze Age Levant from Mediterranean and Levantine Perspectives. JMA 16: 316.Google Scholar
Covello-Paran, K. 1999. The Rural Aspect of the Jezreel Valley during the Intermediate Bronze Age, in Light of the Excavations at ‘Ein Helu (Migdal ha-ʻEmeq). MA thesis, Tel Aviv University.Google Scholar
Covello-Paran, K. 2009. Socio-Economic Aspects of an Intermediate Bronze Age Village in the Jezreel Valley. In The Levant in Transition: Proceedings of a Conference Held at the British Museum on 20–21 April 2004, ed. Parr, P. J., 920. PEFA 9. Leeds: Maney.Google Scholar
Dever, W. G. 2014. Excavations at the Early Bronze IV Sites of Jebel Qa‘aqir and Be’er Resisim. SAHL 6; HSMP. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns.Google Scholar
Douglas, K. 2007. Die Befestigung der Unterstadt von Ḫirbet ez-Zeraqōn im Rahmen der frühbronzezeitlichen Fortifikationen in Palästina. ADPV 27 (3). Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.Google Scholar
Esse, D. L. 1991. Subsistence, Trade, and Social Change in Early Bronze Age Palestine. SAOC 50. Chicago: The Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago.Google Scholar
Evans, A. J. 1921. The Palace of Minos: A Comparative Account of the Successive Stages of the Early Cretan Civilization as Illustrated by the Discoveries at Knossos, Vol. 1: The Neolithic and Early and Middle Minoan Ages. London: MacMillan.Google Scholar
Falconer, S. E., and Fall, P. L. 2016. A Radiocarbon Sequence from Tell Abu en-Ni‘aj, Jordan and Its Implications for Early Bronze IV Chronology in the Southern Levant. Radiocarbon 58: 615–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Falconer, S. E.; Fall, P. L.; and Jones, J. E. 2007. Life at the Foundation of Bronze Age Civilization: Agrarian Villages in the Jordan Valley. In Crossing Jordan: North American Contributions to the Archaeology of Jordan, ed. Levy, T. E., Daviau, P. M. M., Younker, R. W., and Shaer, M., 261–8. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Finkelstein, I. 1996. The Archaeology of the United Monarchy: An Alternative View. Levant 28: 177–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finkelstein, I. 2005. A Low Chronology Update: Archaeology, History and Bible. In The Bible and Radiocarbon Dating: Archaeology, Text and Science, ed. Levy, T. E. and Higham, T. F. G., 3142. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Finkelstein, I., and Piasetzky, E. 2003. Comment on “14C Dates from Tel Rehov: Iron-Age Chronology, Pharaohs, and Hebrew Kings.” Science 302 (5645): 568.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finkelstein, I., and Piasetzky, E. 2010. The Iron I/IIA Transition in the Levant: A Reply to Mazar and Bronk Ramsey and a New Perspective. Radiocarbon 52: 1667–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y., and Ganor, S., eds. 2009. Khirbet Qeiyafa, Vol. 1: Excavation Report 2007–2008. Jerusalem: IES; The Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y.; Ganor, S.; and Hasel, M. G. 2014. Khirbet Qeiyafa, Vol. 2: Excavation Report 2009–2013; Stratigraphy and Architecture (Areas B, C, D E). Jerusalem: IES; The Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y., and Kang, H.-G. 2011. The Relative and Absolute Chronology of Khirbet Qeiyafa: Very Late Iron Age I or Very Early Iron Age IIA? IEJ 61: 171–83.Google Scholar
Garfinkel, Y.; Streit, K.; Ganor, S.; and Hasel, M. G. 2012. State Formation in Judah: Biblical Tradition, Modern Historical Theories, and Radiometric Dates at Khirbet Qeiyafa. Radiocarbon 54: 359–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garfinkel, Y.; Streit, K.; Ganor, S.; and Reimer, P. J. 2015. King David’s City at Khirbet Qeiyafa: Results of the Second Radiocarbon Dating Project. Radiocarbon 57: 881–90.Google Scholar
Genz, H. 2002. Die frühbronzezeitliche Keramik von Ḫirbet ez-Zeraqōn: Mit Studien zur Chronologie und funktionalen Deutung frühbronzezeitlicher Keramik in der südlichen Levante. ADPV 27 (2). Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.Google Scholar
Genz, H. 2010. Recent Excavations at Tell Fadous-Kfarabida. NEA 73: 102–13.Google Scholar
Genz, H. 2014. Excavations at Tell Fadous-Kfarabida, 2004–2011: An Early and Middle Bronze Age Site on the Lebanese Coast. In Egypt and the Southern Levant in the Early Bronze Age, ed. Höflmayer, F. and Eichmann, R., 6991. Orient-Archäologie 31. Rahden/Westf.: Leidorf.Google Scholar
Genz, H. In press. Tell Fadous-Kfarabida I: The Site and Its Environment, ed. Genz, H.. ASORAR. Boston: ASOR.
Gilboa, A., and Sharon, I. 2001. Early Iron Age Radiometric Dates from Tel Dor: Preliminary Implications for Phoenicia and Beyond. Radiocarbon 43: 1343–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gophna, R. 1992. The Intermediate Bronze Age. In The Archaeology of Ancient Israel, ed. Ben-Tor, A., 126–58. Trans. Greenberg, R., from Hebrew. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
Greenberg, R. 2002. Early Urbanizations in the Levant: A Regional Narrative. NAAA. London: Leicester University Press.Google Scholar
Greenberg, R. 2003. Early Bronze Age Megiddo and Bet Shean: Discontinuous Settlement in Sociopolitical Context. JMA 16: 1732.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greenberg, R. 2017. No Collapse: Transmutations of Early Bronze Age Urbanism in the Southern Levant. In The Late Third Millennium in the Ancient Near East: Chronology, C14, and Climate Change; Papers from The Oriental Institute Seminar “The Early/Middle Bronze Age Transition in the Ancient Near East: Chronology, C14, and Climate Change,” Held at The Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago, 7–8 March 2014, ed. Höflmayer, F., 3360. OIS 11. Chicago: The Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago.Google Scholar
Haiman, M. 1996. Early Bronze Age IV Settlement Pattern of the Negev and Sinai Deserts: View from Small Marginal Temporary Sites. BASOR 303: 132.Google Scholar
Harrison, T. P., and Savage, S. H. 2003. Settlement Heterogeneity and Multivariate Craft Production in the Early Bronze Age Southern Levant. JMA 16: 3357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Höflmayer, F. 2014. Dating Catastrophes and Collapses in the Ancient Near East: The End of the First Urbanization in the Southern Levant and the 4.2 ka BP Event. In Overcoming Catastrophes: Essays on Disastrous Agents Characterization and Resilience Strategies in Pre-Classical Southern Levant, ed. Nigro, L., 117–40. ROSAPAT 11. Rome: “La Sapienza” Expedition to Palestine & Jordan.Google Scholar
Höflmayer, F. 2015. The Southern Levant, Egypt, and the 4.2 ka BP Event. In 2200 BC – Ein Klimasturz als Ursache für den Zerfall der Alten Welt? 7. Mitteldeutscher Archäologentag vom 23. bis 26. Oktober 2014 in Halle (Saale) [2200 BC – A Climatic Breakdown as a Cause for the Collapse of the Old World? 7th Archaeological Conference of Central Germany, October 23–26, 2014 in Halle (Saale)], Vol. 1, ed. Meller, H., Arz, H. W., Jung, R., and Risch, R., 113–30. Tagungen des Landesmuseums für Vorgeschichte Halle 12 (1). Halle (Saale): Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie Sachsen-Anhalt.Google Scholar
Höflmayer, F. 2017. The Late Third Millennium B.C. in the Ancient Near East and Eastern Mediterranean: A Time of Collapse and Transformation. In The Late Third Millennium in the Ancient Near East: Chronology, C14, and Climate Change; Papers from The Oriental Institute Seminar “The Early/Middle Bronze Age Transition in the Ancient Near East: Chronology, C14, and Climate Change,” Held at The Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago, 7–8 March 2014, ed. Höflmayer, F., 130. OIS 11. Chicago: The Oriental Institute of The University of Chicago.Google Scholar
Höflmayer, F.; Dee, M. W.; Genz, H.; and Riehl, S. 2014. Radiocarbon Evidence for the Early Bronze Age Levant: The Site of Tell Fadous-Kfarabida (Lebanon) and the End of the Early Bronze III Period. Radiocarbon 56: 529–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Höflmayer, F.; Dee, M. W.; Kutschera, W.; and Wild, E. M. In press. Radiocarbon Dates from Tell Fadous-Kfarabida. In Tell Fadous-Kfarabida I: The Site and Its Environment, ed. Genz, H.. ASORAR. Boston: ASOR.
Kenyon, K. M. 1966. Amorites and Canaanites. Schweich Lectures 1963. London: Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Levy, T. E., and Higham, T. F. G., eds. 2005. The Bible and Radiocarbon Dating: Archaeology, Text and Science. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Malamat, A. 1979. The Age of the Monarchies: Political History. World History of the Jewish People 4 (1). Jerusalem: Massada.Google Scholar
Mazar, A. 1990. Archaeology of the Land of the Bible, Vol. 1: 10,000–586 B.C.E. ABRL. New York: Doubleday.Google Scholar
Mazar, A. 1997. Iron Age Chronology: A Reply to I. Finkelstein. Levant 29: 157–67.Google Scholar
Mazar, A. 2005. The Debate over the Chronology of the Iron Age in the Southern Levant: Its History, the Current Situation, and a Suggested Resolution. In The Bible and Radiocarbon Dating: Archaeology, Text and Science, ed. Levy, T. E. and Higham, T. F. G., 1530. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Mazar, A., and Bronk Ramsey, C. 2008. 14C-Dates and the Iron Age Chronology of Israel: A Response. Radiocarbon 50: 159–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mazar, A.; Bruins, H. J.; Panitz-Cohen, N.; and van der Plicht, J. 2005. Ladder of Time at Tel Rehov: Stratigraphy, Archaeological Context, Pottery, and Radiocarbon Dates. In The Bible and Radiocarbon Dating: Archaeology, Text and Science, ed. Levy, T. E. and Higham, T. F. G., 195255. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Mazar, A., and Carmi, I. 2001. Radiocarbon Dates from Iron Age Strata at Tel Beth Shean and Tel Rehov. Radiocarbon 43: 1333–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mazar, A., and Streit, K. In press. Radiometric Dates from Tel Rehov. In Excavations at Tel Rehov, ed. Mazar, A.. Jerusalem: IES.
Mazar, B. 1968. The Middle Bronze Age in Palestine. IEJ 18: 6597.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. de. 1988. Données nouvelles sur le Bronze ancien de Palestine: Les fouilles de Tel Yarmouth. CRSAIBL 132: 186211.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. 1993. Fouilles récentes à Tel Yarmouth, Israël (1989–1993). CRSAIBL 137: 823–47.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. 1999. Yarmuth: The Dawn of City-States in Southern Canaan. NEA 62: 219.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. 2000. Fouilles de Tel Yarmouth: Résultats des 11e, 12e et 13e campagnes de fouilles (1996–1999). CRSAIBL 144: 679710.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. 2009. Rise and Collapse in the Southern Levant in the Early Bronze Age. Scienze dell’Antichità 15: 101–29.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. 2013. Fouilles de Tel Yarmouth: Résultats des travaux de 2003 à 2009 (14e–18e campagnes). CRSAIBL 157: 759–96.Google Scholar
Miroschedji, P. 2014. The Southern Levant (Cisjordan) during the Early Bronze Age. In The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Levant, c. 8000–332 BCE, ed. Steiner, M. L. and Killebrew, A. E., 307–29. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Misgav, H.; Garfinkel, Y.; and Ganor, S. 2009. The Ostracon. In Khirbet Qeiyafa, Vol. 1: Excavation Report 2007–2008, ed. Garfinkel, Y. and Ganor, S., 243–57. Jerusalem: IES; The Institute of Archaeology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Google Scholar
Nigro, L. 2010. In the Palace of the Copper Axes: Khirbet al-Batrawy; The Discovery of a Forgotten City of the III Millennium BC in Jordan. Trans. Sala, M., from Italian. ROSAPAT 1. Rome: “La Sapienza” Expedition to Palestine & Jordan.Google Scholar
Nigro, L. 2012. Khirbet al-Batrawy III: The EB II–III Triple Fortification Line, and the EB IIIB Quarter inside the City-Wall; Preliminary Report of the Fourth (2008) and Fifth (2009) Seasons of Excavations. ROSAPAT 8. Rome: “La Sapienza” Expedition to Palestine & Jordan.Google Scholar
Palumbo, G. 1991. The Early Bronze Age IV in the Southern Levant: Settlement Patterns, Economy, and Material Culture of a “Dark Age.” CMAO 3. Rome: University of Rome, “La Sapienza.”Google Scholar
Parr, P. J., ed. 2009. The Levant in Transition: Proceedings of a Conference Held at the British Museum on 20–21 April 2004. PEFA 9. Leeds: Maney.Google Scholar
Philip, G. 2003. The Early Bronze Age of the Southern Levant: A Landscape Approach. JMA 16: 103–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prag, K. 2014. The Southern Levant during the Intermediate Bronze Age. In The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of the Levant, c. 8000–332 BCE, ed. Steiner, M. L. and Killebrew, A. E., 388400. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Preucel, R. W., and Meskell, L. 2004. Knowledges. In A Companion to Social Archaeology, ed. Meskell, L. and Preucel, R. W., 322. Malden, MA: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Regev, J.; Miroschedji, P. de; and Boaretto, E. 2012. Early Bronze Age Chronology: Radiocarbon Dates and Chronological Models from Tel Yarmuth (Israel). Radiocarbon 54: 505–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Regev, J.; Miroschedji, P. de; Greenberg, R.; Braun, E.; Greenhut, Z.; and Boaretto, E. 2012. Chronology of the Early Bronze Age in the Southern Levant: New Analysis for a High Chronology. Radiocarbon 54: 525–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reimer, P. J.; Bard, E.; Bayliss, A.; Beck, J. W.; Blackwell, P. G.; Bronk Ramsey, C.; Buck, C. E.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R. L.; Friedrich, M.; Grootes, P. M.; Guilderson, T. P.; Haflidason, H.; Hajdas, I.; Hatté, C.; Heaton, T. J.; Hoffmann, D. L.; Hogg, A. G.; Hughen, K. A.; Kaiser, K. F.; Kromer, B.; Manning, S. W.; Niu, M.; Reimer, R. W.; Richards, D. A.; Scott, E. M.; Southon, J. R.; Staff, R. A.; Turney, C. S. M.; and van der Plicht, J. 2013. Intcal13 and Marine13 Radiocarbon Age Calibration Curves 0–50,000 Years cal BP. Radiocarbon 55: 1869–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Renfrew, C. 1973. Social Archaeology: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered at the University, 20th March, 1973. Southampton: University of Southampton.Google Scholar
Renfrew, C. 1984. Approaches to Social Archaeology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Richard, S. 1980. Toward a Consensus of Opinion on the End of the Early Bronze Age in Palestine-Transjordan. BASOR 237: 534.Google Scholar
Richard, S.; Long, J. C. Jr.; Holdorf, P. S.; and Peterman, G., eds. 2010. Khirbat Iskandar: Final Report on the Early Bronze IV Area C “Gateway” and Cemeteries. ASORAR 14. Boston: ASOR.Google Scholar
Rosen, A. M. 1995. The Social Response to Environmental Change in Early Bronze Age Canaan. JAA 14: 2644.Google Scholar
Seters, J. van. 1997. In Search of History: Historiography in the Ancient World and the Origins of Biblical History. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns.Google Scholar
Sharon, I. 2001. “Transition Dating” – A Heuristic Mathematical Approach to the Collation of Radiocarbon Dates from Stratified Sequences. Radiocarbon 43: 345–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sharon, I.; Gilboa, A.; Tull, A. J. T.; and Boaretto, E. 2007. Report on the First Stage of the Iron Age Dating Project in Israel: Supporting a Low Chronology. Radiocarbon 49: 146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Singer-Avitz, L. 2016. Khirbet Qeiyafa: Late Iron Age I in Spite of It All – Once Again. IEJ 66: 232–44.Google Scholar
Stager, L. E. 1992. The Periodization of Palestine from the Neolithic through Early Bronze Times. In Chronologies in Old World Archaeology, Vol. 2, ed. Ehrich, R. W., 2260. 3rd ed. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Stager, L. E. 2003. The Patrimonial Kingdom of Solomon. In Symbiosis, Symbolism, and the Power of the Past: Canaan, Ancient Israel, and Their Neighbors from the Late Bronze Age through Roman Palaestina; Proceedings of the Centennial Symposium, W. F. Albright Institute of Archaeological Research and American Schools of Oriental Research Jerusalem, May 29–31, 2000, ed. Dever, W. G. and Gitin, S., 6374. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns.Google Scholar
Staubwasser, M., and Weiss, H. 2006. Holocene Climate and Cultural Evolution in Late Prehistoric–Early Historic West Asia. Quaternary Research 66: 372–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stuiver, M., and Suess, H. E. 1966. On the Relationship between Radiocarbon Dates and True Sample Ages. Radiocarbon 8: 534–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, R. E., and Bar-Yosef, O. 2014. Radiocarbon Dating: An Archaeological Perspective. 2nd ed. Creek, Walnut, CA: Left Coast.Google Scholar
Thompson, T. L. 1999. The Mythic Past: Biblical Archaeology and the Myth of Israel. London: Basic Books.Google Scholar
Toffolo, M. B.; Arie, E.; Martin, M. A. S.; Boaretto, E.; and Finkelstein, I. 2014. Absolute Chronology of Megiddo, Israel, in the Late Bronze and Iron Ages: High-Resolution Radiocarbon Dating. Radiocarbon 56: 221–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weinstein, J. M. 1984. Radiocarbon Dating in the Southern Levant. Radiocarbon 26: 297366.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weiss, H., and Bradley, R. S. 2001. What Drives Societal Collapse? Science 291 (5504): 609–10.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weiss, H.; Courty, M.-A.; Wetterstrom, W.; Guichard, F.; Senior, L.; Meadow, R.; and Curnow, A. 1993. The Genesis and Collapse of Third Millennium North Mesopotamian Civilization. Science 261 (5124): 9951004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weninger, F.; Steier, P.; Kutschera, W.; and Wild, E. M. 2006. The Principle of the Bayesian Method. Egypt and the Levant 16: 317–24.Google Scholar
Yadin, Y. 1958. Solomon’s City Wall and Gate at Gezer. IEJ 8: 80–6.Google Scholar
Yadin, Y.; Aharoni, Y.; Amiran, R.; Dothan, T.; Dunayevsky, I.; and Perrot, J. 1958. Hazor I: An Account of the First Season of Excavations, 1955. Jerusalem: The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.Google Scholar

References

Albright, W. F. 1924. The Archaeological Results of an Expedition to Moab and the Dead Sea. BASOR 14: 212.Google Scholar
Appadurai, A. 1986. Introduction: Commodities and the Politics of Value. In The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective, ed. Appadurai, A., 363. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baker, J. L. 2012. The Funeral Kit: Mortuary Practices in the Archaeological Record. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Ben Zion, I. 2016. Norway Launches Probe after Envoy’s Driver Caught Smuggling Artifacts. The Times of Israel, June 6. www.timesofisrael.com/norway-launches-probe-after-driver-busted-smuggling-artifacts-from-jordan/ (accessed September 12, 2017).
Bernhardsson, M. T. 2005. Reclaiming a Plundered Past: Archaeology and Nation Building in Modern Iraq. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Bisheh, G. 2001. One Damn Illicit Excavation after Another: The Destruction of the Archaeological Heritage of Jordan. In Trade in Illicit Antiquities: The Destruction of the World’s Archaeological Heritage, ed. Brodie, N., Doole, J., and Renfrew, C., 115–18. MIM. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.Google Scholar
Burström, N. M. 2014. Things in the Eye of the Beholder: A Humanistic Perspective on Archaeological Object Biographies. Norwegian Archaeological Review 47: 6582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chatterjee, P. 1993. The Nation and Its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories. Princeton Studies in Culture/Power/History. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Chesson, M. S. 1999. Libraries of the Dead: Early Bronze Age Charnel Houses and Social Identity at Urban Bab edh-Dhra‘, Jordan. JAA 18: 137–64.Google Scholar
Chesson, M. S.. 2015. Reconceptualizing the Early Bronze Age Southern Levant without Cities: Local Histories and Walled Communities of EB II–III Society. JMA 28: 2179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Çelik, Z. 2011. Defining Empire’s Patrimony: Late Ottoman Perceptions of Antiquities. In Scramble for the Past: A Story of Archaeology in the Ottoman Empire, 1753–1914, ed. Bahrani, Z., Çelik, Z, and Eldem, E., 443–78. Istanbul: SALT.Google Scholar
Çelik, Z.. 2016. About Antiquities: Politics of Archaeology in the Ottoman Empire. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Corbett, E. D. 2015. Competitive Archaeology in Jordan: Narrating Identity from the Ottomans to the Hashemites. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Dannehl, K. 2009. Object Biographies: From Production to Consumption. In History and Material Culture: A Student’s Guide to Approaching Alternative Sources, ed. Harvey, K., 123–38. Routledge Guides to Using Historical Sources. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Dobres, M.-A., and Robb, J. E., eds. 2000. Agency in Archaeology. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Donkow, I. 2004. The Ephesus Excavations 1863–1874, in the Light of the Ottoman Legislation on Antiquities. Anatolian Studies 54: 109–17.Google Scholar
Efrat, A. 2012. Governing Guns, Preventing Plunder: International Cooperation against Illicit Trade. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Eldem, E. 2011. From Blissful Indifference to Anguished Concern: Ottoman Perceptions of Antiquities, 1799–1869. In Scramble for the Past: A Story of Archaeology in the Ottoman Empire, 1753–1914, ed. Bahrani, Z., Çelik, Z., and Eldem, E., 281330. Istanbul: SALT.Google Scholar
Goode, J. F. 2007. Negotiating for the Past: Archaeology, Nationalism, and Diplomacy in the Middle East, 1919–1941. Austin: University of Texas Press.Google Scholar
Gosden, C., and Marshall, Y. 1999. The Cultural Biography of Objects. WA 31: 169–78.Google Scholar
Hahn, H. P., and Weiss, H., eds. 2013. Mobility, Meaning and Transformations of Things: Shifting Contexts of Material Culture through Time and Space. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
Holtorf, C. 2002. Notes on the Life History of a Pot Sherd. Journal of Material Culture 7: 4971.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Joy, J. 2009. Reinvigorating Object Biography: Reproducing the Drama of Object Lives. WA 41: 540–56.Google Scholar
Joy, J.. 2015. “Things in Process”: Biographies of British Iron Age Pits. In Biography of Objects: Aspekte eines kulturhistorischen Konzepts, ed. Boschung, D., Kreuz, P.-A., and Kienlin, T., 125–41. Morphomata 31. Paderborn: Fink.Google Scholar
Joyce, R. A., and Gillespie, S. D. 2015. Making Things Out of Objects That Move. In Things in Motion: Object Itineraries in Anthropological Practice, ed. Joyce, R. A. and Gillespie, S. D., 320. Santa Fe, NM: School for Advanced Research Press.Google Scholar
Joyce, R. A., and Gillespie, S. D., eds. 2015. Things in Motion: Object Itineraries in Anthropological Practice. Santa Fe, NM: School for Advanced Research Press.Google Scholar
Keane, W. 2006. Subjects and Objects. In Handbook of Material Culture, ed. Tilley, C., Keane, W., Küchler, S., Rowlands, M., and Spyer, P., 197202. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M. 2006. From the Ground to the Buyer: A Market Analysis of the Trade in Illegal Antiquities. In Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities Trade, ed. Brodie, N., Luke, C., and Tubb, K. Walker, 188205. Cultural Heritage Studies. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M.. 2008. The Trade in Palestinian Antiquities. Jerusalem Quarterly 33 (winter): 2138.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M.. 2010. The Changing Legal Landscape for Middle Eastern Archaeology in the Colonial Era, 1800–1930. In Pioneers to the Past: American Archaeologists in the Middle East, 1919–1920, ed. Emberling, G., 8590. OIP 30. Chicago: The Oriental Institute.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M.. 2015a. Fractured Oversight: The ABCs of Cultural Heritage in Palestine after the Oslo Accords. JSA 15: 2444.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M.. 2015b. Storage Wars: Solving the Archaeological Curation Crisis? JEMAHS 3: 4254.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M.. 2017. Object Movement: UNESCO, Language, and the Exchange of Middle Eastern Artifacts. In The Routledge Companion to Cultural Property, ed. Anderson, J. and Geismar, H., 277–94. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Kersel, M. M., and Chesson, M. S. 2013. Looting Matters: Early Bronze Age Cemeteries of Jordan’s Southeast Dead Sea Plain in the Past and Present. In The Oxford Handbook of the Archaeology of Death and Burial, ed. Tarlow, S. and Stutz, L. Nilsson, 677–94. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Knappett, C. 2013. Imprints as Punctuations of Material Itineraries. In Mobility, Meaning and Transformations of Things: Shifting Contexts of Material Culture through Time and Space, ed. Hahn, H. P. and Weiss, H., 3649. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
Knappett, C., and Malafouris, L., eds. 2008. Material Agency: Towards a Non-Anthropocentric Approach. Boston: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kopytoff, I. 1986. The Cultural Biography of Things: Commoditization as Process. In The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective, ed. Appadurai, A., 6491. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lapp, P. 1966. The Cemetery at Bab edh-Dhra‘, Jordan. Archaeology 19: 104–11.Google Scholar
Lapp, P. 1968. Bâb edh-Dhrâʻ, Perizzites and Emim. In Jerusalem through the Ages: The Twenty-Fifth Archaeological Convention, October 1967, 125. Jerusalem: IES.Google Scholar
Latour, B. 1992. Where Are the Missing Masses? The Sociology of a Few Mundane Artifacts. In Shaping Technology/Building Society: Studies in Sociotechnical Change, ed. Bijker, W. E. and Law, J., 225–58. Inside Technology. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Maeir, A. M.; Davis, B.; Horwitz, L. K.; Asscher, Y.; and Hitchcock, L. A. 2015. An Ivory Bowl from Early Iron Age Tell es-Safi/Gath (Israel): Manufacture, Meaning and Memory. WA 47: 414–38.Google Scholar
Mallon, A. 1924. Voyage d’exploration au sud-est de la Mer Morte. Biblica 5: 413–55.Google Scholar
Mark, V. 1994. Objects and Their Maker: Bricolage of the Self. In The Socialness of Things: Essays on the Socio-Semiotics of Objects, ed. Riggins, S. H., 63100. Approaches to Semiotics 115. Berlin: De Gruyter.Google Scholar
Mitcham, C. 2013. Agency in Humans and in Artifacts: A Contested Discourse. In The Moral Status of Technical Artefacts, ed. Kroes, P. and Verbeek, P.-P., 1129. Philosophy of Engineering and Technology 17. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
Naím, M. 2005. Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers, and Copycats Are Hijacking the Global Economy. New York: Doubleday.Google Scholar
Özel, S. 2010. Under the Turkish Blanket Legislation: The Recovery of Cultural Property Removed from Turkey. International Journal of Legal Information 38: 177–84.Google Scholar
Riggins, S. H. 1994. Introduction. In The Socialness of Things: Essays on the Socio-Semiotics of Objects, ed. Riggins, S. H., 16. Approaches to Semiotics 115. Berlin: De Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Robb, J. 2015. What Do Things Want? Object Design as a Middle Range Theory of Material Culture. APAAA 26: 166–80.Google Scholar
Saller, S. 1964–1965. Bab edh-Dhra‘. LibAnn 15: 137219.Google Scholar
Schaub, R. T., and Rast, W. 1989. Bab edh-Dhrāʻ Excavations in the Cemetery Directed by Paul W. Lapp (1965–67). REDSPJ 1. Winona Lake, IN: Published for ASOR by Eisenbrauns.Google Scholar
Shaw, W. M. K. 2003. Possessors and Possessed: Museums, Archaeology, and the Visualization of History in the Late Ottoman Empire. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Silberman, N. A. 1998. Power, Politics and the Past: The Social Construction of Antiquity in the Holy Land. In The Archaeology of Society in the Holy Land, ed. Levy, T. E., 923. NAAA. London: Leicester University Press.Google Scholar
Taha, H. 2010. The Current State of Archaeology in Palestine. Present Pasts 21: 1625.Google Scholar
Thomas, J. 1996. Time, Culture and Identity: An Interpretive Archaeology. Material Cultures. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Weiner, A. B. 1994. Cultural Difference and the Density of Objects. American Ethnologist 21: 391403.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Winner, L. 1980. Do Artifacts Have Politics? Dædalus 109 (1): 121–36.Google Scholar

References

Abt, J. 2011. The Origins of the Public Museum. In A Companion to Museum Studies, ed. Macdonald, S., 115–33. Blackwell Companions in Cultural Studies 12. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Abu Amma, F. 1988. The Impact of Museums on the Achievement and Attitudes of Pupils Regarding Social Studies at Year Six of Elementary Education. MA thesis, Ain Shams University, Cairo [Arabic].Google Scholar
Abu-Khafajah, S. 2007. Meaning and Use of Cultural Heritage in Jordan: Towards a Sustainable Approach. PhD diss., Newcastle University.Google Scholar
Abu-Khafajah, S.; al-Rabady, R.; and Rababeh, S. 2015. Urban Heritage “Space” under Neoliberal Development: A Tale of a Jordanian Plaza. International Journal of Heritage Studies 21: 441–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andah, B. W. 1997. The Ibadan Experience to Date. In Museums & Archaeology in West Africa, ed. Ardouin, C. D., 1223. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press; London: Currey.Google Scholar
Anderson, G., ed. 2004. Reinventing the Museum: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on the Paradigm Shift. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
Badran, A. 2001. The Communication of Archaeological Museums with Their Communities in Jordan. MA thesis, Newcastle University.Google Scholar
Badran, A.. 2010. Archaeological Museums and Schools: Teaching Primary-Aged Children about the Past in Jordan. PhD diss., Newcastle University.Google Scholar
Badran, A.. 2011. The Excluded Past in the Jordanian Formal Primary Education: Introducing Archaeology. In New Perspectives in Global Public Archaeology, ed. Okamura, K. and Matsuda, A., 197216. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Badran, A.. 2012. A Report on Engaging Young People in Their National Tangible and Intangible Heritage in Jordan. Amman: UNESCO.Google Scholar
Badran, A.. 2013. Engaging Young People in Their National Tangible and Intangible Heritage in Jordan: UNESCO Project – Phase II. Amman: UNESCOGoogle Scholar
Badran, A.. 2014. Heritage Education in Jordanian Schools: For Knowledge or Profit? In Public Participation in Archaeology, ed. Thomas, S. and Lea, J., 105–16. Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer.Google Scholar
Bashkin, O. 2006. When Mu’awiya Entered the Curriculum: Some Comments on the Iraqi Education System in the Interwar Period. CER 50: 346–66.Google Scholar
Beavis, J., and Hunt, A., eds. 1999. Communicating Archaeology: Papers Presented to Bill Putnam at a Conference Held at Bournemouth University in September 1995. Bournemouth University School of Conservation Sciences Occasional Paper 4. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
Bennett, T. 1995. The Birth of the Museum: History, Theory, Politics. Culture: Policy and Politics. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Binford, L. 1972. An Archaeological Perspective. New York: Seminar Press.Google Scholar
Boylan, P. 1990. Museums and Cultural Identity. Museums Journal 90 (10): 2933.Google Scholar
al-Burai, I. 1984. The Impact of Using Historical Remains on Achieving Educational Objectives of History Teaching in Elementary Education. MA thesis, Ain Shams University, Cairo [Arabic].Google Scholar
Burcaw, G. E. 1983. Introduction to Museum Work. Rev. and exp. 2nd ed. Nashville, TN: American Association for State and Local History.Google Scholar
Cameron, D. F. 2004. The Museum, a Temple or a Forum. In Reinventing the Museum: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on the Paradigm Shift, ed. Anderson, G., 6173. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
Childe, V. G. 1957. The Dawn of European Civilization. History of Civilization. Rev. 6th ed. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.Google Scholar
Clark, G. 1943. Education and the Study of Man. Antiquity 17 (67): 113–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corbett, G., and Ronza, E. In press. Making Social Engagement Sustainable: Insights from the Temple of the Winged Lions Cultural Resource Management Initiative in Petra. In Community Heritage in the Arab Region, ed. Badran, A. and Abu-Khafajah, S.. New York: Springer.
Dana, J. C. 2004. The Gloom of the Museum. In Reinventing the Museum: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on the Paradigm Shift, ed. Anderson, G., 1329. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
al-Deek, A. A. 2007. Assessment of the Educational Role of the Museum of Jordanian Heritage at Yarmouk University. MA thesis, Yarmouk University.Google Scholar
Dewey, J. 1959. The School and the Society. In Dewey on Education: Selections with an Introduction and Notes, ed. Dworkin, M., 3390. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
Department of Antiquities. 2004. The Law of Antiquities: Law No. 21 for the Year 1988 and Its Amendments. Amman: Jordan Press Foundation.
Falk, J. H., and Dierking, L. D. 1992. The Museum Experience. Washington, DC: Whalesback.Google Scholar
Greene, K. 2002. Archaeology: An Introduction; The History, Principles and Methods of Modern Archaeology. 4th ed. London: RoutledgeGoogle Scholar
Günther, S. 2006. Be Masters in That You Teach and Continue to Learn: Mediaeval Muslim Thinkers on Educational Theory. CER 50: 367–88.Google Scholar
Harding, L. G. 1967. The Antiquities of Jordan. New York: Praeger.Google Scholar
Hein, G. E. 1996. Constructivist Learning Theory. In Developing Museum Exhibitions for Lifelong Learning, ed. Durbin, G., 30–4. London: Stationery Office; Museums & Galleries Commission; Group for Education in Museums.Google Scholar
Hein, G. E., and Alexander, M. 1998. Museums: Places of Learning. Professional Practice Series. Washington, DC: Education Committee, American Association of Museums.Google Scholar
Helmore, G. A. 1969. Piaget – A Practical Consideration: A Consideration of the General Theories and Work of Jean Piaget, with an Account of a Short Follow Up Study of His Work on the Development of the Concept of Geometry. Oxford: Pergamon.Google Scholar
Henson, D.; Stone, P.; and Corbishley, M., eds. 2004. Education and the Historic Environment. Issues in Heritage Management. London: RoutledgeGoogle Scholar
Hodder, I. 1991. Reading the Past: Current Approaches to Interpretation and Archaeology. 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Hodder, I., and Doughty, L., eds. 2007. Mediterranean Prehistoric Heritage: Training, Education and Management. MIM. Cambridge: McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research.Google Scholar
Hooper-Greenhill, E. 1991. Museum and Gallery Education. London: Leicester University Press.Google Scholar
Jameson, J. H. Jr., ed. 1997. Presenting Archaeology to the Public: Digging for Truths. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
Jensen, N. 1994. Children’s Perceptions of Their Museum Experiences: A Contextual Perspective. Children’s Environments 11: 300–24.Google Scholar
Johnson, M. 1999. Archaeological Theory: An Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar
Kreishan, D. 2011. The Role of Museums in Children’s Education: A Case Study of Children’s Museum in Jordan. MA thesis, The Hashemite University [Arabic].Google Scholar
Lewis, G. 1984. Museums and Their Precursors: A Brief World Survey. In Manual of Curatorship: A Guide to Museum Practice, ed. Thompson, J. M. A., 521. Oxford: Butterworths.Google Scholar
Malas, M. 1997. The Role of Museums in Education. Education 122: 157–65 [Arabic].Google Scholar
Malt, C. 2005. Women’s Voices in Middle East Museums: Case Studies in Jordan. Gender, Culture, and Politics in the Middle East. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press.Google Scholar
Meital, Y. 2006. School Textbooks and Assembling the Puzzle of the Past in Revolutionary Egypt. Middle Eastern Studies 42: 255–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Merriman, N. 1991. Beyond the Glass Case: The Past, the Heritage and the Public in Britain. Leicester Museum Studies Series. Leicester: Leicester University Press.Google Scholar
Moe, J. M. 2000. Archaeology and Values: Respect and Responsibility for Our Heritage. In The Archaeology Education Handbook: Sharing the Past with Kids, ed. Smardz, K. and Smith, S. J., 249–66. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
Pearce, S. 1990. Objects of Knowledge. New Research in Museum Studies 1. London: Athlone.Google Scholar
Pyburn, K. A. 2000. Gatekeeping, Housekeeping, Peacekeeping: Goals for Teaching Archaeology in the Public Schools. In The Archaeology Education Handbook: Sharing the Past with Kids, ed. Smardz, K. and Smith, S. J., 274–8. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
Qaoud, I. al-. 2003. The Efficiency of Using Educational Museum in Achievement and Developing Creative Feeling for the Basic Seventh Grade Students Learning History in Jordan. Educational Research Center Journal 11: 209–38.Google Scholar
Rashdan, A. Z., and Hamshri, A. A. 2003. The Education System in Jordan 1921–2002. Amman: Dar Safa [Arabic].Google Scholar
Renfrew, C., and Bahn, P. 2004. Archaeology: Theories, Methods, and Practice. 4th ed. London: Thames & Hudson.Google Scholar
Roberts, L. C. 1997. From Knowledge to Narrative: Educators and the Changing Museum. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
Sarkaz, A. 1977. The Impact of Using Educational Resources for Teaching History at the Primary Level in the Libyan Arab Republic. MA thesis, Tanta University.Google Scholar
Shayyab, A. al-, and al-Muheisen, Z. 2008. Archaeology and Jordanian Museums. Amman: Ministry of Culture [Arabic].Google Scholar
Shanks, M., and Hodder, I. 1995. Processual, Postprocessual, and Interpretive Archaeologies. In Interpreting Archaeology: Finding Meaning in the Past, ed. Hodder, I., Shanks, M., Alexandri, A., Buchli, V., Carman, J., Last, J., and Lucas, G., 329. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Shanks, M., and Tilley, C. 1987. Re-Constructing Archaeology: Theory and Practice. New Studies in Archaeology. Cambridge: Cambridge University PressGoogle Scholar
Smardz, K., and Smith, S. J., eds. 2000. The Archaeology Education Handbook: Sharing the Past with Kids. Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira.Google Scholar
Stone, P. G. 1994. Introduction: A Framework for Discussion. In The Presented Past: Heritage, Museums and Education, ed. Stone, P. G. and Molyneaux, B. L., 1428. OWA 25. London: Routledge in association with English Heritage.Google Scholar
Stone, P. G., and Molyneaux, B. L., eds. 1994. The Presented Past: Heritage, Museums and Education. OWA 25. London: Routledge in association with English Heritage.Google Scholar
Tawfiq, N. R. 1994. School Visits to Archaeological Museums in Jordan. In Museums, Civilization and Development: Proceedings of the Encounter, Amman, Jordan, 26–30 April 1994, 183–85. Paris: ICOM.Google Scholar
Trigger, B. G. 1989. A History of Archaeological Thought. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Trigger, B. G.. 1995. Romanticism, Nationalism and Archaeology. In Nationalism, Politics and the Practice of Archaeology, ed. Kohl, P. L. and Fawcett, C., 263–79. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Tweiq, S. 2002. The Alphabets of the Excavation. Athar 5: 42–3 [Arabic].Google Scholar
Ucko, P. 1990. Foreword. In The Excluded Past: Archaeology in Education, ed. Stone, P. and MacKenzie, R., 924. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Vries, B. de. 2013. Archaeology and Community in Jordan and Greater Syria: Traditional Patterns and New Directions. NEA 76: 132–41.Google Scholar
Vygotsky, L. 1978. Mind in Society: The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Weil, S. 1990. Rethinking the Museum and Other Meditations. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×