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Part Four

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2018

Assaf Yasur-Landau
Affiliation:
University of Haifa, Israel
Eric H. Cline
Affiliation:
George Washington University, Washington DC
Yorke Rowan
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
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The Social Archaeology of the Levant
From Prehistory to the Present
, pp. 391 - 506
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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