Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-4hhp2 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-05-22T15:55:00.744Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Chapter 10 - Sleep deprivation: biomarkers for identifying and predicting individual differences in response to sleep loss

from Section 2 - Sleep Disorders and Excessive Sleepiness

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Michael J. Thorpy
Affiliation:
Sleep-Wake Disorders Center, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA
Michel Billiard
Affiliation:
Guide Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, France
Get access

Summary

This chapter summarizes trait-like (phenotypic) individual differences in neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep deprivation, and current promising efforts to identify objective and biological markers of such differences. Sleep loss has increasingly become a major public health concern as population studies worldwide have found reduced sleep duration associated with increased risks of obesity, morbidity, and mortality. Available data suggest that common genetic variations (polymorphisms) involved in sleep-wake, circadian, and cognitive regulation may underlie symptomatic aspects of these large interindividual differences in neurobehavioral vulnerability to sleep deprivation in healthy adults. The impairing effects of sleep loss on neurobehavioral functions are the most well-established and conspicuous consequences of sleep deprivation. They include fatigue and sleepiness and unstable wakefulness; deficits in attention, working memory and executive functions; reduced mood-affect regulation; and increased accidents and injuries. Identifying who is likely to suffer neurobehavioral impairments would improve prevention of sleep deprivation and mitigation of its behavioral morbidity.
Type
Chapter
Information
Sleepiness
Causes, Consequences and Treatment
, pp. 101 - 110
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×