Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-t82dr Total loading time: 0.648 Render date: 2021-12-06T15:03:27.755Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 17 - Use of stimulants in operational settings: issues and considerations

from Section 4 - Summary and Conclusions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 September 2012

Nancy J. Wesensten
Affiliation:
Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland
Get access

Summary

Stimulant use has been a feature of some military operations. Caffeine, amphetamines were used by German, British, American, and Japanese forces during WWII, both for their fatigue-ameliorating effects and for their effects on mood and morale. The US Air Force (USAF) officially sanctioned amphetamines to promote alertness in selected aircrew within the Strategic Air Command (SAC) in 1960 and within the Tactical Air Command (TAC) in 1962. The US military maintains a stimulant policy while most of its allies do not allow use of stimulants to maintain/restore performance and manage fatigue. A review of international military service policies reveals a variety of policies on pharmacological fatigue management. Force Health Protection (FHP) is defined specifically as "an organized program of healthcare preventive or therapeutic treatment, or preparations for such treatment, designed to meet the actual, anticipated, or potential needs of a group of military personnel in relation to military missions".
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
2
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×