Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-8r8mm Total loading time: 0.684 Render date: 2021-11-28T00:40:24.806Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

2 - Primate Development and Growth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

Timothy D. Smith
Affiliation:
Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania
Valerie B. DeLeon
Affiliation:
University of Florida
Christopher J. Vinyard
Affiliation:
Northeast Ohio Medical University
Jesse W. Young
Affiliation:
Northeast Ohio Medical University
Get access

Summary

Birth represents a transitional point in time – a static moment that borders a time of complete dependency and the march toward independence. This chapter reviews some basic concepts of vertebrate development and histology. Of particular relevance are tissue changes that reflect differentiation of mineralized tissues: skeletogenesis and odontogenesis, beginning with changes to the primitive connective tissue (mesenchyme). Viewed by microscopy, mesenchyme condenses prior to differentiation into cartilage, bone or tooth germs. Most mesenchymal condensations for the skeleton form during the embryonic period, but they continue to appear during the fetal period or postnatally for some structures (e.g., successional teeth). Most growth of the skeleton occurs during the fetal and postnatal periods. Mineralized connective tissues have different available growth processes. The contributions of appositional growth (new matrix is added to existing matrix), interstitial growth (cell replication and matrix production within existing tissue), and bone modeling (selective osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity) are discussed according to types of bones and skeletal regions.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×