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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 June 2019

Susan Gal
Affiliation:
University of Chicago
Judith T. Irvine
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
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Signs of Difference
Language and Ideology in Social Life
, pp. 289 - 310
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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