Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-kpmwg Total loading time: 0.458 Render date: 2021-12-06T19:18:41.801Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

25 - Natural Diseases Causing Sudden Death in Infancy and Early Childhood

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 July 2018

Victoria A Bryant
Affiliation:
UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health London, London, UK
Neil J Sebire
Affiliation:
UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health London, London, UK Camelia Botnar Laboratories, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London, UK
Jodhie R. Duncan
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
Roger W. Byard
Affiliation:
University of Adelaide
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Global childhood mortality rates in the under-5s were 44 per 1,000 live births in 2013, ranging from 2.3 in Singapore to 152.5 in Guinea-Bissau (Western sub-Saharan Africa), with rates of 4.9 per 1,000 live births in the United Kingdom (UK) (1). In England and Wales there are >5,000 deaths annually in children aged 0-19 years (2) from an estimated population of 12.9 million in this age group (3). Around 3,000 of these deaths are in infants (less than 1 year) with the majority having known serious medical conditions; such deaths are hence “expected”. Most are due to perinatal and immaturityrelated conditions, which account for around 40% of cases, followed by congenital anomalies. Many of these deaths occur in the early (less than 7 days) or late neonatal (7 to 27 days) period (2). The next most commonly affected age group is adolescents, who account for around 1,000 deaths annually, with more than half being due to external, non-natural causes (2).

Unexpected death occurring in an apparently healthy infant is termed “sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI)” and refers to such a presentation in an infant 7-365 days of age. According to most definitions, unexpected deaths in infants under 7 days of age are excluded from the SUDI category, and instead have been termed “sudden unexpected early neonatal death (SUEND)”. All cases of SUDI and SUEND require investigation to determine the cause of death. In England and Wales such cases are referred to Her Majesty's Coroner (HMC), who will direct a post-mortem examination by a specialist pediatric pathologist. The primary rationale of the postmortem examination, including its components and ancillary investigations, is to diagnose or exclude those natural (and non-natural) causes of death which are identifiable and to allow a specific cause of death to be provided (the specific details of the autopsy procedure are detailed in Chapter 24). Whilst many cases will subsequently be found to have died from previously unrecognized medical conditions, such as congenital anomalies or acquired natural diseases, a significant number will remain unexplained despite a complete autopsy including ancillary investigations (microbiology, virology, radiology, and metabolic studies).

Type
Chapter
Information
SIDS Sudden Infant and Early Childhood Death
The past, the present and the future
, pp. 539 - 588
Publisher: The University of Adelaide Press
Print publication year: 2018

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×