Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-x5mqb Total loading time: 0.208 Render date: 2021-12-07T16:03:11.303Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

2 - Shakespeare in Performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 November 2007

Peter Holland
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
Get access

Summary

On first reading, the subtitle to Christoph Clausen's comparative study of Verdi's and Shakespeare's Macbeth seems a little unwieldy: 'negotiating historical and medial difference'. Amplified by Clausen's own metaphor of travelling between his two texts as 'two nations', however, it offers three axes for the development of the field of performance criticism evidenced in the books under consideration. Performances in different times and places are usefully triangulated by a notion of performance as the translation of Shakespeare's texts into different media: visual art, film and music as well as theatre.

Stuart Sillars's Painting Shakespeare: The Artist as Critic, 1720–1820 argues that the visual artists he discusses derive their inspiration from reading, rather than seeing, Shakespeare. He begins with John Wootton's 1750 painting Macbeth and Banquo meeting the Weird Sisters. Wootton depicts the two captains in plumed helmets and Jacobite drapes in the bottom centre of a forbidding khaki woodland scene from which three piratical female figures in chimneypot hats emerge, barefoot and leaning on sticks. Two birds are silhouetted against the bright break in the clouds. The composition of the picture bears down heavily on the figures, overwhelming them with the dark tones of windswept vegetation. It is one of sixteen colour plates – not enough – and 101 black and white illustrations to this volume. Sillars expertly sketches the ways in which this illustration draws on naturalistic painting conventions and on Gaspard Dughtet and Poussin, rather than on the theatrical Macbeth reintroduced by Garrick, arguing that its context is textual and art historical rather than dramatic.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare Survey , pp. 353 - 360
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2007

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×