Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-bjz6k Total loading time: 0.533 Render date: 2022-05-22T15:11:50.154Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Book contents

The Editor as Translator

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2007

Peter Holland
Affiliation:
University of Notre Dame, Indiana
Get access

Summary

In a world in which scholarly communication is increasingly monolingual and where scholars no longer need feel embarrassed if they only consult studies in one language, it may be strange to raise the issue of translation in editing Shakespeare. But there are at least two reasons to do so: it is much more common than one may think, and it offers opportunities that may lead to useful contributions to Shakespeare studies. Provocatively, an edition might be called a translation manqué.

Even editors of ‘monolingual’ editions, of course, keep translating, from early modern English into the language of their twenty-first-century audience. They may not see their work as such, because of their sense that Shakespeare and their audience are part of the same culture; indeed, one of the motives for editing and re-editing his works is certainly to keep this sense alive. But just because editors are aware that this commonality of culture has its limits they will add glosses, where necessary; in N. F. Blake’s words, ‘the impression is given that provided the odd difficult word is translated, there should be no difficulty in understanding what Shakespeare wrote’.

Translation also plays a subtle, but consequential role in the modernization of spelling. The issues involved are particularly difficult where modern spelling forces the editor to narrow down early modern meanings, e.g. when having to choose between the modern spellings travel and travail, or metal and mettle. According to Stanley Wells

a modernizing editor should select what he regards as the primary meaning, irrespective of the original spelling, print this, and annotate the secondary meaning.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare Survey , pp. 193 - 197
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×