Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-8r8mm Total loading time: 0.277 Render date: 2021-12-07T16:41:14.053Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

4 - Shakespeare in the open: outdoor performance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

Michael Dobson
Affiliation:
Birkbeck College, University of London
Get access

Summary

quince Pat, pat; and here's a marvellous convenient place for our rehearsal. This green plot shall be our stage, this hawthorn brake our tiring-house …

(A Midsummer Night's Dream, 3.1.2–4)

It would not be fair to say that the collective idealism which filled Britain with amateur dramatic societies in the 1920s and 1930s and sustained such enterprises as the National Theatre of Hohenfels in the early 1940s has completely dissipated since the end of the Second World War. It might be accurate, however, to suggest that it has found different channels of expression, and that these have often by-passed the non-professional stage. Since the passage of the National Theatre Act in 1949, the establishment of the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1960 and the belated inauguration of the National Theatre Company at the Old Vic in 1963, amateur societies and specialist clubs have no longer had a near-monopoly on the performance of plays which could not be guaranteed a commercially viable run in the West End, especially those of Shakespeare. The post-war expansion of universities (some with new-fangled drama departments, such as the country's first, at Bristol, founded in 1946) provided an outlet for much young talent which might otherwise have gone into local amateur groups, while the establishment of the Fringe alongside the first Edinburgh Festival in 1947 offered a new forum for avant-garde theatre on the borderline between student drama and the profession.

Type
Chapter
Information
Shakespeare and Amateur Performance
A Cultural History
, pp. 152 - 196
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×