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Section 3 - The self in specific psychological disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2016

Michael Kyrios
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
Richard Moulding
Affiliation:
Deakin University, Victoria
Guy Doron
Affiliation:
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel
Sunil S. Bhar
Affiliation:
Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria
Maja Nedeljkovic
Affiliation:
Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria
Mario Mikulincer
Affiliation:
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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