Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-5d59c44645-mhl4m Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-03-02T20:02:23.561Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

17 - Painful incoherence: the self in borderline personality disorder

from Section 3 - The self in specific psychological disorders

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2016

Michael Kyrios
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
Richard Moulding
Affiliation:
Deakin University, Victoria
Guy Doron
Affiliation:
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel
Sunil S. Bhar
Affiliation:
Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria
Maja Nedeljkovic
Affiliation:
Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria
Mario Mikulincer
Affiliation:
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel
Get access
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1978). Patterns of Attachment: A Psychological Study of the Strange Situation. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Amini, F., Lewis, T., Lannon, R., et al. (1996). Affect, attachment, memory: Contributions toward psychobiologic integration. Psychiatry, 59, 213239.Google Scholar
Bateman, A. W. & Fonagy, P. (2004).Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: Mentalization Based Treatment. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Bowlby, J. (1969). Attachment and Loss. Vol. 1. London: The Hogarth Press.Google Scholar
Carlson, E. A., Egeland, B., & Sroufe, L. A. (2009). A prospective investigation of the development of borderline personality symptoms. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 13111334.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carlson, E. A., Yates, T. M., & Sroufe, A. (2009). Dissociation and the development of the self. In Dell, P. F. & O’Neill, J. A. (Eds.), Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders (pp. 3952). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Cloitre, M., Courtois, C. A., Ford, J. D., et al. (2012). The ISTSS Expert Consensus Treatment Guidelines for Complex PTSD in Adults. Retrieved from http://www.istss.org/Google Scholar
Courtois, C. A. & Ford, J. D. (2013). Treating Complex Trauma: A Sequenced, Relationship-based Approach. New York, NY: GuilfordGoogle Scholar
Dutra, L., Bureau, J., Holmes, B., Lyubchik, A., & Lyons-Ruth, K. (2009). Quality of early care and childhood trauma: A prospective study of developmental pathways to dissociation. Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 197, 383339.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Farina, B., Speranza, A. M., Dittoni, S., et al. (2014). Memories of attachment hampers EEG cortical connectivity in dissociative patients. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 264, 449458.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Farina, B. & Liotti, G. (2013). Does a dissociative psychopathological dimension exist? A review on dissociative processes and symptoms in developmental trauma spectrum disorders. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 10, 1118.Google Scholar
Fonagy, P. & Bateman, A. (2008). Attachment, mentalization and borderline personality disorder. European Psychiatry, 8, 3547.Google Scholar
George, C. & Solomon, J. (2008). The caregiving system: A behavioral systems approach to parenting. In Cassidy, J. & Shaver, P. R. (Eds.), Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research and Clinical Applications (2nd ed., pp. 833856). New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Gervai, J. (2009). Environmental and genetic influences on early attachment. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, 3, 25. doi: 10.1186/1753-2000-3-25Google Scholar
Ginot, E. (2007). Intersubjectivity and neuroscience: Understanding enactments and their therapeutic significance within emerging paradigms. Psychoanalytic Psychology, 24, 317332.Google Scholar
Gunderson, J. G. & Lyons-Ruth, K. (2008). BPD’s interpersonal hypersensitivity phenotype: A gene–environment–developmental model. Journal of Personality Disorders, 22, 2241.Google Scholar
Hesse, E. (2008). The Adult Attachment Interview: Protocol, method of analysis, and empirical studies. In Cassidy, J. & Shaver, P. R. (Eds.), Handbook of Attachment: Theory, Research and Clinical Applications (2nd ed., pp. 552598). New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Hesse, E., Main, M., Abrams, K. Y., & Rifkin, A. (2003). Unresolved states regarding loss or abuse can have “second-generation” effects: Disorganized, role-inversion and frightening ideation in the offspring of traumatized non-maltreating parents. In Siegel, D. J. & Solomon, M. F. (Eds.), Healing Trauma: Attachment, Mind, Body and Brain (pp. 57106). New York, NY: Norton.Google Scholar
Hesse, E. & Main, M. (2006). Frightened, threatening, and dissociative parental behavior in low-risk samples: Description, discussion, and interpretations. Development and Psychopathology, 18, 309343.Google Scholar
Holmes, E., Brown, R. J., Mansell, W., et al. (2005). Are there two qualitatively distinct forms of dissociation? A review and some clinical implications. Clinical Psychology Review, 25, 123.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hood, B. (2012). The Self Illusion: Why There Is No You Inside Your Head. London: Constable.Google Scholar
Howell, E. (2008). From hysteria to chronic relational trauma disorder: The history of borderline personality disorder and its links with dissociation and psychosis. In Moskowitz, A., Schafer, I, & Dorahy, M. J. (Eds.), Psychosis, Trauma and Dissociation (pp. 105116). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Karpman, S. (1968). Fairy tales and script drama analysis. Transactional Analysis Bulletin, 7, 3943.Google Scholar
Kernberg, O. F., Yeomans, F. E., Clarkin, J. F., & Levy, K. N. (2008). Transference focused psychotherapy: Overview and update. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 89, 601620.Google Scholar
Leichsenring, F., Leibing, E., Kruse, J., New, A., & Leweke, P. (2011). Borderline personality disorder. Lancet, 377, 7484.Google Scholar
Levy, K. N. (2005). The implications of attachment theory and research for understanding borderline personality disorder. Development and Psychopathology, 17, 959986.Google Scholar
Linehan, M. M. (1993). Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder. New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Liotti, G. (1992). Disorganized/disoriented attachment in the etiology of the dissociative disorders. Dissociation, 5, 196204.Google Scholar
Liotti, G. (2004). Trauma, dissociation and disorganized attachment: Three strands of a single braid. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 41, 472486.Google Scholar
Liotti, G. (2011). Attachment disorganization and the controlling strategies: An illustration of the contributions of attachment theory to developmental psychopathology and to psychotherapy integration. Journal of Psychotherapy Integration, 21, 232252.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liotti, G. (2014). Disorganized attachment in the pathogenesis and the psychotherapy of borderline personality disorder. In Danquah, A. N. & Berry, K. (Eds.), Attachment Theory in Adult Mental Health (pp. 113128). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Liotti, G., Cortina, M., & Farina, B. (2008). Attachment theory and the multiple integrated treatment of borderline personality disorder. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 36, 293312.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liotti, G. & Gilbert, P. (2011). Mentalizing, motivation and social mentalities: Theoretical considerations and implications for psychotherapy. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 84, 925.Google Scholar
Lyons-Ruth, K. (1998). Implicit relational knowing: Its role in development and psychoanalytic treatment. Infant Mental Health Journal, 19, 282289.3.0.CO;2-O>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lyons-Ruth, K., Bureau, J., Holmes, B., Easterbrooks, A.,& Brooks, N. H. (2102). Borderline symptoms and suicidality/self-injury in late adolescence: Prospectively observed relationship correlates in infancy and childhood. Psychiatry Research, 24, 6578.Google Scholar
Lyons-Ruth, K., & Jacobvitz, D. (2008). Attachment disorganization: Genetic factors, parenting contexts and developmental transformations from infancy to adulthood. In Cassidy, J. & Shaver, P. R. (Eds.), Handbook of Attachment (2nd ed., pp. 666697). New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Lyons-Ruth, K., Melnick, S., Patrick, M., & Hobson, R. P. (2007). A controlled study of hostile–helpless states of mind among borderline and dysthymic women. Attachmentand Human Development, 9, 116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lyons-Ruth, K., Yellin, C., Melnick, S., & Atwood, G. (2003). Childhood experiences of trauma and loss have different relations to maternal unresolved and hostile–helpless states of mind on the AAI. Attachment and Human Development, 5, 330352.Google Scholar
Main, M., & Hesse, E. (1990). Parents’ unresolved traumatic experiences are related to infant disorganized attachment status: Is frightened and/or frightening parental behavior the linking mechanism? In Greenberg, M. T., Cicchetti, D., & Cummings, E. M. (Eds.), Attachment in the Preschool Years (pp. 161182). Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
Main, M., & Solomon, J. (1990). Procedures for identifying infants as disorganized/disoriented during the Strange Situation. In Greenberg, M. T., Cicchetti, D., & Cummings, E. M. (Eds.), Attachment in the Preschool Years (pp. 121160). Chicago, IL: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
Meares, R. (2012a). A Dissociation Model of Borderline Personality Disorder. New York, NY: Norton.Google Scholar
Meares, R. (2012b) Borderline Personality Disorder and the Conversational Model: A Clinician’s Manual. New York, NY: Norton.Google Scholar
Meares, R., Gerull, F., Stevenson, J., & Korner, A. (2011). Is self disturbance the core of borderline personality disorder? An outcome study of borderline personality factors. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 45(3), 214222.Google Scholar
Moss, E., Smolla, N., Cyr, C., et al. (2006). Attachment and behavior problems in middle childhood as reported by adult and child informants. Development and Psychopathology, 18, 425444.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nijenhuis, E. R & Van der Hart, O. (2011). Dissociation in trauma: A new definition and comparison with previous formulations. Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 12, 416445.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ogawa, J. R., Sroufe, L. A., Weinfield, N. S., Carlson, E. A. & Egeland, B. (1997). Development and the fragmented self: Longitudinal study of dissociative symptomatology in a nonclinical sample. Development and Psychopathology, 9, 855879.Google Scholar
Porges, S. W. (1997). Emotion: An evolutionary by-product of the neural regulation of the autonomic nervous system. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 807, 6277.Google Scholar
Porges, S. W. (2001). The polyvagal theory: Phylogenetic substrates of a social nervous system. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 42, 123146.Google Scholar
Schore, A. N. (2009). Attachment, trauma and the developing right brain: Origins of pathological dissociation. In Dell, P. F. & O’Neil, J. A. (Eds.), Dissociation and the Dissociative Disorders: DSM-V and Beyond (pp. 107141). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Solomon, J. & George, C. (2011). Disorganization of maternal caregiving across two generations: The origins of caregiving helplessness. In Solomon, J. & George, C. (Eds.), Disorganized Attachment and Caregiving (pp. 2551). New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar
Van der Hart, O. & Dorahy, M. (2006). Pierre Janet and the concept of dissociation. American Journal of Psychiatry, 163, 1646.Google Scholar
Van der Hart, O., Nijenhuis, E. R. S., & Steele, K. (2006). The Haunted Self: Structural Dissociation and the Treatment of Chronic Traumatization. New York, NY: Norton.Google Scholar
Van IJzendoorn, M. H., Schuengel, C., & Bakermans- Kranenburg, M. J. (1999). Disorganized attachment in early childhood: Meta-analysis of precursors, concomitants and sequelae. Development and Psychopathology, 11, 225250.Google Scholar
Wilkinson-Ryan, T. & Westen, D. (2000). Identity disturbance in borderline personality disorder: An empirical investigation. American Journal of Psychiatry, 157, 528541.Google Scholar
Young, J. E., Klosko, J. S., & Weishaar, M. (2003). Schema Therapy: A Practitioner Guide. New York, NY: Guilford.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×