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23 - Future directions in examining the self in psychological disorders

from Section 4 - Conclusions and future directions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2016

Michael Kyrios
Affiliation:
Australian National University, Canberra
Richard Moulding
Affiliation:
Deakin University, Victoria
Guy Doron
Affiliation:
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel
Sunil S. Bhar
Affiliation:
Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria
Maja Nedeljkovic
Affiliation:
Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria
Mario Mikulincer
Affiliation:
Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel
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Print publication year: 2016

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References

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