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5 - Governance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Stuart Corbridge
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Glyn Williams
Affiliation:
Keele University
Manoj Srivastava
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
René Véron
Affiliation:
University of Guelph, Ontario
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Summary

Introduction

Michel Foucault once told an interviewer that it was important to be humble in the face of apparent social irruptions. We should be properly alert, he said, to continuities of history and geography, and not constantly on the look out for markers of ‘the new’ or what today might be called ‘the post-’. This is surely good advice, and we need to bear it in mind when discussing issues like participation and good governance. The idea that states in the past have not been concerned with good government is clearly wrong. The emergence of biopolitics is one strong indicator of the responsibilities that governments are meant to have to their populations. Nevertheless, there is a strong perception in the development community that state failure and bad governance have become important issues since the 1970s, and this perception has been linked to a broader critique of rent-seeking behaviour, simple predation, and dirigiste development.

In the next part of the chapter we review some of the debates that have attended the rise of the good governance agenda. We shall also follow Adrian Leftwich and Rob Jenkins in drawing attention to the ways in which the agendas of good governance can be said to depoliticize accounts of development and rule. They do so, not least, by refusing to pay close attention to questions of state capabilities, and the incapacity of some regimes to secure control over their territories.

Type
Chapter
Information
Seeing the State
Governance and Governmentality in India
, pp. 151 - 187
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

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  • Governance
  • Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics and Political Science, Glyn Williams, Keele University, Manoj Srivastava, London School of Economics and Political Science, René Véron, University of Guelph, Ontario
  • Book: Seeing the State
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511492211.007
Available formats
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  • Governance
  • Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics and Political Science, Glyn Williams, Keele University, Manoj Srivastava, London School of Economics and Political Science, René Véron, University of Guelph, Ontario
  • Book: Seeing the State
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511492211.007
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Governance
  • Stuart Corbridge, London School of Economics and Political Science, Glyn Williams, Keele University, Manoj Srivastava, London School of Economics and Political Science, René Véron, University of Guelph, Ontario
  • Book: Seeing the State
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511492211.007
Available formats
×