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8 - Security in WiMax networks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2010

Amitabh Mishra
Affiliation:
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
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Summary

The IEEE has created a new standard, called IEEE 802.16, that deals with providing broadband wireless access to residential and business customers, and is popularly known as WiMax [1]. The Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMax) is a non-profit industry trade organization that is overseeing the implementation of this standard, which is expected to replace services like Cable, DSL, and T1 line for last-mile broadband network access. It can replace these services because it has a target transmission rate that can exceed 100 Mbps. The transmission range for the WiMax devices is stated to be up to 31 miles, which also far exceeds WiFi's transmission range of approximately 100 meters [2, 3]. With such a large transmission range, a single base station is capable of providing broadband connections to even an entire city. This chapter, briefly introduces the WiMax standard and then discusses the security and privacy features of such networks.

Introduction

The WiMax standard was designed with the ability to provide quality of service (QoS); as a result it can support delay-sensitive applications and services. Since it is connection oriented, it has the ability to perform per-connection QoS, allowing it to operate in both dedicated and best-effort situations.

The WiMax standard was created to meet the growing demand for broadband wireless access (BWA). This demand has proven to be challenging for service providers due to the absence of a global standard. Currently, many service providers have created proprietary solutions based on a modified version of 802.11 instead.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2008

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References

WiMax, IEEE 802.16a Standard and WiMAX Igniting Broadband Wireless Access, White paper, www.wimaxforum.org/news/downloads/WiMAXWhitepaper.pdf.
Abichar, Z., Yanlin, P., and Chang, J. M., “WiMax: the emergence of wireless broadband,” IT Professional, vol. 8, 2006, pp. 44–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Conti, J. P., “The long road to WiMAX [wireless MAN standard],” IEE Review, vol. 51, 2005, pp. 38–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rathgeb, B. and Qiang, C., Utilizing the IEEE 802.16 Standard for Homeland Security Applications, Proc. SPIE Defense and Security Symposiun: Technologies for Homeland Security and Law Enforcement, Orlando, FL, USA, 2005.Google Scholar
Donahoo, M. and Steckler, B., Emergency Mobile Wireless Networks, Proc. IEEE MILCOM, Atlantic City, NJ, USA, 2005.Google Scholar
IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks Part 16: Air Interface for Fixed Broadband Wireless Access Systems, IEEE Std 802.16-2004 (Revision of IEEE Std 802.16-2001), 2004, pp. 0_1–857.
Cicconetti, C., Lenzini, L., Mingozzi, E., and Eklund, C., “Quality of service support in IEEE 802.16 networks,” IEEE Network, vol. 20, 2006, pp. 50–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnston, D. and Walker, J., “Overview of IEEE 802.16 security,” IEEE Security & Privacy, vol. 2, 2004, pp. 40–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
IEEE Standard for Local and Metropolitan Area Networks Part 16: Air Interface for Fixed and Mobile Broadband Wireless Access Systems Amendment 2: Physical and Medium Access Control Layers for Combined Fixed and Mobile Operation in Licensed Bands and Corrigendum 1, IEEE Std 802.16e-2005 and IEEE Std 802.16-2004/Cor 1-2005 (Amendment and Corrigendum to IEEE Std 802.16-2004), 2006, pp. 0_1–822.
Nuaymi, L., WiMAX – Technology for Broadband Wireless Access, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2007.Google Scholar
Pareek, D., The Business of WiMAX, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2007.Google Scholar

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  • Security in WiMax networks
  • Amitabh Mishra, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • Book: Security and Quality of Service in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks
  • Online publication: 26 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511619755.009
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To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Security in WiMax networks
  • Amitabh Mishra, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • Book: Security and Quality of Service in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks
  • Online publication: 26 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511619755.009
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Security in WiMax networks
  • Amitabh Mishra, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
  • Book: Security and Quality of Service in Ad Hoc Wireless Networks
  • Online publication: 26 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511619755.009
Available formats
×