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4 - Islam and Secularization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2015

Gudrun Krämer
Affiliation:
University of Berlin
Hans Joas
Affiliation:
University of Erfurt and University of Chicago
Klaus Wiegandt
Affiliation:
Founder and CEO of the foundation Forum für Verantwortung
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Summary

For a number of years, public debate has distinguished more clearly between Islam and Islamism than was formerly the case, and quite rightly so: Islam is a world religion with well over a billion followers, who live and experience their religion in a wide variety of ways. Sunnis differ in certain respects from Shiites, traditionalist Muslims from liberal ones; some seek a spiritual path to God, others want nothing to do with mysticism; some lead an ascetic lifestyle, others enjoy life to the full; many see politics as an important aspect of their religion, while others reject politics in the name of Islam. Different ways of understanding and living Islam stretch far back into history; in the present era, they have taken on distinctive, specifically modern aspects. Overall, Islam is certainly as plural and diversified as Christianity, and it has been so from the very beginning, particularly with respect to how Muslims have imagined community and society, the good life and good government. Islamism, which receives so much attention today, is therefore just one possible way among several of applying Islamic teachings to individual conduct and the social order. The boundary between Islam and Islamism is, however, not always easy to draw. In many fields, Islamists now dominate to such an extent that one might think that they are in fact the only legitimate representatives of Islam (and this is, of course, how they view themselves).

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Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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  • Islam and Secularization
  • Edited by Hans Joas, University of Erfurt and University of Chicago, Klaus Wiegandt, Founder and CEO of the foundation Forum für Verantwortung
  • Book: Secularization and the World Religions
  • Online publication: 05 June 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.5949/UPO9781846315671.006
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  • Islam and Secularization
  • Edited by Hans Joas, University of Erfurt and University of Chicago, Klaus Wiegandt, Founder and CEO of the foundation Forum für Verantwortung
  • Book: Secularization and the World Religions
  • Online publication: 05 June 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.5949/UPO9781846315671.006
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Islam and Secularization
  • Edited by Hans Joas, University of Erfurt and University of Chicago, Klaus Wiegandt, Founder and CEO of the foundation Forum für Verantwortung
  • Book: Secularization and the World Religions
  • Online publication: 05 June 2015
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.5949/UPO9781846315671.006
Available formats
×