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7 - Putting down the Rising

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

John Barrell
Affiliation:
Professor of English Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of York
Leith Davis
Affiliation:
Simon Fraser University, British Columbia
Ian Duncan
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
Janet Sorensen
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
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Summary

Early nineteenth-century Edinburgh had a lot less time for James Hogg than for “the Ettrick Shepherd,” the literary persona created partly by Hogg himself, partly by the tight circle that ran Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. Comic, bibulous, full of naïve folk-wisdom, easy to patronize, the Ettrick Shepherd was invented as a souvenir of the pastoral lowlands, a survival whose presence among one of the Edinburgh literary élites could represent both the continuity of modern Scots culture and the impolite past it had left behind. The Ettrick Shepherd, though perhaps more pliable, certainly more reassuringly conservative than Burns had been, could not always be relied upon to play this part, and had occasionally to be reminded of his place by editors, reviewers, even by himself. But he was much more comfortable to be with than James Hogg, the author of obsessive, experimental fictions which either satirized or ignored the decencies of polite letters. To some degree even these could be bowdlerized and domesticated, as many of them were in the Victorian collections of Hogg's fiction published after his death, and passed off as written “by the Ettrick Shepherd.” But one in particular, and for my money the best of them – The Three Perils of Woman – was immediately recognized as irredeemable by its first reviewers, and until 1995 had never been reprinted.

The Three Perils of Woman was published in 1823, a year before The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

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  • Putting down the Rising
    • By John Barrell, Professor of English Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of York
  • Edited by Leith Davis, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley, Janet Sorensen, University of California, Berkeley
  • Book: Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511484186.008
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  • Putting down the Rising
    • By John Barrell, Professor of English Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of York
  • Edited by Leith Davis, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley, Janet Sorensen, University of California, Berkeley
  • Book: Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511484186.008
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Putting down the Rising
    • By John Barrell, Professor of English Centre for Eighteenth-Century Studies, University of York
  • Edited by Leith Davis, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley, Janet Sorensen, University of California, Berkeley
  • Book: Scotland and the Borders of Romanticism
  • Online publication: 22 September 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511484186.008
Available formats
×