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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2022

Lachlan Fleetwood
Affiliation:
University College Dublin
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Science on the Roof of the World
Empire and the Remaking of the Himalaya
, pp. 257 - 281
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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